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Muso440
-25th April 2003, 06:48
Okay, I've only just started fencing (as some of you will know already), about 6 weeks, and have only been going once a week so far. At the moment I feel like I'm making v. little progress whatsoever. How often should I be going to practice to get better? Can once a week be enough? Twice a week? Three times a week? I don't want to be Olympic standard within a year or anything, I just want to vaguely get the hang of what I'm doing and be able to parry a bit....:confused:

kingkenny
-25th April 2003, 07:32
two times a week with one half hour run and you will be fit as a fiddle and improve faster. Also if you buy a foil you can practice moves at home.:o

Aoife
-25th April 2003, 19:34
two times a week with one half hour run and you will be fit as a fiddle and improve faster. Also if you buy a foil you can practice moves at home

Okay, who's been bugging me?! :)


I started out once a week, then after three months I got the oportunity to go twice a week. I also try to get in some other form of exercise once a week (normally a PE lesson is good for this, but if not I tend to cycle).

Getting a foil is a very good idea. Try to visualise an opponant and practise moves against them (although don't try to practise moves with engagement, as the feel will be very different if you don't actually have another sword to be engaged with).

If you want a cheap foil, you could try and get one second hand, keep an eye out at the thrift shops at www.gofence.com (my experiance with the has been excellent). Or you could buy a brand new one if you want (and if you have the resources).


If you feel out of your depth now, don't worry. Nobody picks up a sword and can fence in their first lesson. Fencing is something in which you are continually learning, and I hope you come to see that aspect as an enjoyable one. You will improve, even if it seems like slow progress at the moment.


Keep it up, and good luck!!!

Muso440
-25th April 2003, 21:10
Ta for the encouraging words Aoife!

I actually managed to get a few hits in tonight so am not feeling *quite* so crap....

Aoife
-26th April 2003, 15:16
You're more than welcome Muso.

Isn't it a wonderful feeling when you first start getting hits in! My biggest aim at the moment is to try and beat my coach some time in the next 2 years. Whenever I hit him I feel elated :grin:

Muso440
-26th April 2003, 18:09
My aim at the moment is just to beat the guy who started at the same time as me. He's got a mean parry, but then doesn't riposte, (or indeed do anything), which is a bit weird to deal with (especially as I'm trying to learn my ROW rules). Whereas my parries *and* my ripostes are crap. So then he hits me anyway. My coach tries to make me feel better by saying that he's a bloke therefore more aggressive than us girls. Which just makes *me* aggressive and think 'I'm definitely going to hit you next time you male aggressive b*****d!' and then I miss again, grgrgrgr.

Aoife
-27th April 2003, 17:38
More agressive my a$$. I've seen (and fenced) some incrediably agressive girls. (The only guy I've ever fenced is my coach, and he's not that agressive). When I did karate though I fought mostly guys, and there was a mixture of those who were agressive and those who weren't.

Being agressive isn't always a good think, if you're too aggressive you can loose control of what you're doing.

If he's not riposting right away, try catch him in the moment after he parries. Or trick him into parrying when you're not attacking, then attack. Use the fact he's not riposting to your advantage.

Muso440
-28th April 2003, 07:51
Originally posted by Aoife
More agressive my a$$. I've seen (and fenced) some incrediably agressive girls.

Yeah, I'm inclined to agree with you there. I think my coach is just trying to make me feel better!


If he's not riposting right away, try catch him in the moment after he parries. [/QUOTE]

Is that allowed? DOesn't he have right of way if he's parried? Or can I somehow get ROW back again?


Or trick him into parrying when you're not attacking, then attack. Use the fact he's not riposting to your advantage. [/QUOTE]

Nice idea, but not sure how I do that at the moment!
:confused:

Hudson
-28th April 2003, 09:12
I was given a great bit of advice many years ago " Never do competative sport against women"

This was from the doctor in A&E were i was nursing a broken wrist after a boys v girls hockey match.

Good advice i think

Gav
-28th April 2003, 09:15
Originally posted by Muso440
My aim at the moment is just to beat the guy who started at the same time as me. He's got a mean parry, but then doesn't riposte, (or indeed do anything), which is a bit weird to deal with (especially as I'm trying to learn my ROW rules). Whereas my parries *and* my ripostes are crap. So then he hits me anyway. My coach tries to make me feel better by saying that he's a bloke therefore more aggressive than us girls. Which just makes *me* aggressive and think 'I'm definitely going to hit you next time you male aggressive b*****d!' and then I miss again, grgrgrgr.

So this guy parries then DOESN'T riposte. Try continuing. If he doesn't do anything then the hit is yours. Alternatively draw the parry then deceive and continue. The problem with this in Foil is that if there is any blade contact that looks like a parry then it go against you. Having said that it could look like you 'beat' blade (thus ensuring your priority). I know your only beginner but these options should demonstrate the range of options that are available to you.

Bear in mind that your opponent is probably more experienced than you. Don't expect to beat anyone straight off work on technique first.

Aoife
-28th April 2003, 12:26
Is that allowed? DOesn't he have right of way if he's parried? Or can I somehow get ROW back again?

Yes, if he doesn't reposte quickly enough right of way is returned to you.




Nice idea, but not sure how I do that at the moment!

Make it look like you're going to attack, but don't. He'll probably respond by trying to parry, but your blade isn't where he thinks it will be, so then you can attack him when he's unprepared. One of the most simple ways to fein an attack would be to stamp your front foot (called an 'appel or something... I'm not sure on the French). The noise and motion will make him think an attack is being made. Perhaps you could leave it just a fraction of a second before commencing your real attack (that's called a ballestra) which breaks up his timing for the parry because he won't know what you're doing.


Does that make any sense?

rory
-28th April 2003, 12:54
A couple of minor points (sorry Aoife! :-))
Firstly, saying that if he doesn't riposte "quickly enough" you can get the hit is a little bit misleading.

Technically, the riposte has to start *immediately* - i.e. as soon as you've made the parry, your point has to begin moving toward making the riposte - that is, extending and offering a threat on your opponent's target. The actual speed of the motion is irrelevant, it's the immediacy of the beginning of the motion that matters. Does that make sense?
;)

Other minor point, a ballestra is actually a hopping movement. Think of it as lifting your front foot (toes lifting first), and slapping it back down whilst making a small, rapid forward hop on the back foot. It's used a an extra-fast short step, and I personally often us ballestra lunge instead of step lunge for extra speed and surprise.

Oh yeah - there's also the patinando (sp?), which seems to be taught differently by some coaches, but when I learnt it involved a quick tap/slap of the foot halfway through the lunge. Again, for surprise - it's good combined with a feint if your timing is good enough, beacuse your opponent will think your lunge has finished and won't retreat far enough, and the final extension of the lunge should hit them.

Aoife
-28th April 2003, 19:12
Thanks rory, I sort of knew that, but didn't communicate it in any way clearly. You did a far better job! (I've only been fencing a few months, I'm still trying to pick up the explinations of moves, sometimes i can see it in my head, but not say what is happening)

Muso440
-28th April 2003, 19:55
Originally posted by Hudson
I was given a great bit of advice many years ago " Never do competative sport against women"

This was from the doctor in A&E were i was nursing a broken wrist after a boys v girls hockey match.

Good advice i think

For some reason this reminds me of a friend of mine who broke her husband's finger while she was giving birth. Quite justified, in my opinion.;)

Muso440
-28th April 2003, 20:04
Aaarrrgghhh technical information overload! This is going to take me about a month to digest! (But appreciated anyway!:) I would rather have info overload than my posts being ignored)



If he doesn't do anything then the hit is yours.

Cool!





Alternatively draw the parry then deceive and continue.

Er, that one's a bit beyond me at the moment. Know about it in theory, but brain / hand not advanced enough to do it in practice:confused:



Bear in mind that your opponent is probably more experienced than you.

Nah, he's a beginner too, that's what makes it so annoying!



Oh yeah - there's also the patinando (sp?), which seems to be taught differently by some coaches, but when I learnt it involved a quick tap/slap of the foot halfway through the lunge. Again, for surprise - it's good combined with a feint if your timing is good enough, beacuse your opponent will think your lunge has finished and won't retreat far enough, and the final extension of the lunge should hit them.

That sounds good but *definitely* beyond me at the moment...

I'll let you know how I get on and when I win!
:)

Aoife
-28th April 2003, 20:09
The patinando [poss. sic] is beyond me too! :) The second I read it I made a quick post-it-note to myself to ask my coach about it.

Even though the brain/hand co-ordination isn't working now, that you know the theory is good. With practice the rest will hopefully follow. (That's what I keep telling myself anyway! :) )

Muso440
-16th May 2003, 18:19
Originally posted by Muso440
I'll let you know how I get on and when I win!


I beat him :) :) :) :party: :party:

Serves him right for taking too many weeks off.

Rdb811
-17th May 2003, 00:06
Originally posted by Muso440
Okay, I've only just started fencing (as some of you will know already), about 6 weeks, and have only been going once a week so far. At the moment I feel like I'm making v. little progress whatsoever. How often should I be going to practice to get better? Can once a week be enough? Twice a week? Three times a week? I don't want to be Olympic standard within a year or anything, I just want to vaguely get the hang of what I'm doing and be able to parry a bit....:confused:

I usually try and encourage two nights a week - I average two nights plus the usual extras at the weekend - it doesn't do me a blind bit of good, mind. While learning as a beginner you will need a lot more attention from the coach hence it's better to stick to one night until you are able to fence other fencers and synthese what two differnt coaches are saying - so I'd wait a couple of months before going to another club, although speak to your coach and see what he says.

Aoife
-17th May 2003, 20:31
I beat him

Well done!!!

:mexwave:

Hudson
-17th May 2003, 20:42
i run/coach one night a week and try and train on the following night, if i'm not to tired.

Moose
-18th May 2003, 05:50
I train 3 times a week now :)

Muso440
-18th May 2003, 06:41
Originally posted by Aoife
Well done!!!

:mexwave:

Ta!

Muso440
-18th May 2003, 06:42
Originally posted by Moose
I train 3 times a week now :)

Moose, do you ever sleep?
But anyway: so do you reckon it makes a difference? (ie. training 3 times a week, not sleeping...)

I might go 3 times a week in the summer when things are usually boring work-wise and I want more excitement in my life...

Moose
-18th May 2003, 06:47
Well 2 times a week is at my uni club which is as much social as anything else, but the third is at my other club and I get lessons from the county sabre coach there.

As for not sleeping, I only got in from work at 5, to find my house a tip. Grrrrrrr, read my post in Chit Chat if you want the details.

whizzkid1982
-22nd May 2003, 09:26
currently i train 4 times a week. monday afternoon i get a lesson. teusday and thursday i fence at a club in Durham, then on wednesday afternoon i have uni training. i think it does make a difference how much you train. i have noticed distinct improvements in my performance since doing more training.

i would say that you should do more than you feel capable of doing. if one night a week is tirering you out and you don't think you will learn anything from the extra session then it is not worth it. however it is a case of trial and error. :grin:

Jambo
-22nd May 2003, 12:40
I can vouch for that, the b*ggers definetly got a lot better and is even beating me in foil now:upset: (this is all assuming this person is who I think it is, the anonymity of the t'internet, bah)

I've just started training 3 times a week and running a few times a week. It makes a big difference but now I hurt all week instead of just thursdays!!