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doobarz
-12th November 2003, 22:33
Anyone got any tips/ advice on these?

Jambo
-13th November 2003, 08:11
What about them? How would it help fencing?

whizzkid1982
-13th November 2003, 10:01
have been told about abit about them. they are very useful in the gym. i want to know how roboust they are cos i would be interested to wear one whilst fencing, just to see how hard i actually work during a fight!

srb
-13th November 2003, 10:31
Using a heart rate can give great feedback on level of effort, and help with a controlled training regime. I use a heart rate monitor when using an indoor turbo trainer (time trial bike mounted on resistance rollers).

Remember that HR is both person and activity specific. My resting HR is 39 bpm, my max cycling HR is 196 bpm. If I was running my max may be a couple of beats higher. I have two turbo training sessions that I find a heart rate monitor useful.

1. Aerobic fitness - I ride for 5 mins at a HR of 120, 5 mins at 140, 5 mins at 160, 10 mins at 170, 5 minutes at 140, 5 mins at 120 to warm down. This is a fantastic session for general fitness, strength, and time trialling.

2. Anaerobic fitness - Interval Training. Similar start; 5 mins at 120, 5 mins at 140, 5 mins at 160, 5 mins at 170, 15 secs at max effort, 45 secs recovery, 15 secs at max (repeated no more than 6 times - or I will die!!), 5 mins at 140, 5 mins at 120. This is a good session for anything that involves fast bursts of energy. In cycling it would be a sprint finish in a road race.

I can't use a HRM on the road as my HR is never steady enough, and sometimes you have too listen to your body, not a digital read out. I can't see the point of wearing one when fencing. I don't see that you would get any useful feedback even if you had a data logging one. Also I think there is a good chance it would get broken. Given that the transmitter is strapped to your chest there is a good chance it will get hit. Also there is a good chance that the watch will get hit. Alot of them do not have scratch resistant glass on the watch face either.

So for fencing I would not bother for any other activity than circuit training, but having made good use of them in another discipline I would never bother wearing one when fencing.

srb (who used to be a fit cyclist until he returned to fencing, now just a fat fencer)

tigger
-13th November 2003, 10:31
Not as hard as you work at the bar whizzo :grin:

whizzkid1982
-13th November 2003, 10:39
Originally posted by tigger
Not as hard as you work at the bar whizzo :grin:


but i've never had a bar job!!! :grin:

obviously don't know what you could be talking about!

Homer
-13th November 2003, 11:03
the only use these would have are as follows:
As you couldn't actually see what your heart rate was doing during a fight it would be pointless in that respect.
If you get a better model (one that is compatible with a p.c) you can record your H.R patterns throughout a fight/round/competition.

This would be brilliant, you could then see what your H.R peak, average, and recovery was like. Thereby being able to design specific interval training for fencing.
i.e. if your heart rate went up to 169 during a point and came back down to 132 during the rest, taking into consideration the time frame that this happens within, you could design some pretty good intervals.

Generally though H.R monitors aren't brilliant for fencing (Polar are the best make)

Jambo
-13th November 2003, 12:05
Originally posted by srb
My resting HR is 39 bpm

What?! That would make you superbly fit or very ill.

Boo Boo
-13th November 2003, 12:06
I always use a HRM (Polar) at the gym: means that I can ensure that my aerobic training is raising my heart rate to a suitable level (and can push myself harder as required).

Have tried wearing a HRM whilst fencing - just to see what my heart rate got up to (although, obviously, could only check it inbetween hits). That was quite surprising. It would be about 150/160ish in a regular training fight, but would go up to the late 180s/early 190s in a very high intensity fight. I think it just highlighted the importance of getting fitter...

I think that everybody who goes to the gym should have one - very useful :)

Boo

srb
-13th November 2003, 12:28
Originally posted by Jambo
What?! That would make you superbly fit or very ill.

I'm not ill (well not physically anyway!)

When I say 39, my HRM only goes down to 40 then it alarms. So all I know is that it is below 40. My resting HR actually hovers between 39 and 42. Probably nearer 42 at the moment. Cycling 5000 miles a year does seem to promote conditions that are fairly conducive for general fitness.

And then there was fencing!!! - So now my knees hurt, my ankles hurt, my left foot hurts, my right shoulder's stiff, my road bike has been put in the loft, the others are getting dusty, and my resting HR will be going up.

srb

Jambo
-13th November 2003, 12:32
You must be very fit, normal resting HR is 60-100. Mine hovers just below 60 if I havent had too many coffee's

Boo Boo
-13th November 2003, 12:36
Originally posted by srb
my left foot hurts

Why do I have no sympathy for this? (hhmmm, could it be something to do with you stamping on my right foot on a weekly basis!?)

Boo
(not bitter, just sore... ;) )

Homer
-13th November 2003, 12:45
Originally posted by Boo Boo
I always use a HRM (Polar) at the gym: means that I can ensure that my aerobic training is raising my heart rate to a suitable level (and can push myself harder as required).
Boo

This works for some people, but not for others. Lets say a normal training zone for fencers is between 75-85% of HR max, for more experienced exercisers this fine, your heart rate will slowly climb up until you're at your desired level. Less experienced exercisers, and just some people in general's heart rates shoot up very high.
In this case the feeling of how hard exercise is more important than the actual HR.
By using RPE (rate of percieved exertion) for example a scale of 1-10 1 being easy 10 being ready to fall over. By working at around 7-8 on this scale has the same effect (cheaper than buying a HR monitor too)

srb
-13th November 2003, 12:45
But my heart rate always goes up when fencing Boo Boo!:eyerise:

Homer
-13th November 2003, 12:47
is that all that goes up??!!

srb
-13th November 2003, 12:48
Now, now

Boo Boo
-13th November 2003, 12:50
You would complain if your right foot was now 5 sizes bigger and a centimeter thinner than 2 months ago :(

Boo
(should have got steel toe caps in her new fencing shoes...)

doobarz
-13th November 2003, 14:01
Right, let me explain myself a little better - I want this to monitor my HR in the gym/ running/ circuits/ interval training, to ensure I am working hard enough/ not working too hard - not interested in use when actually fencing.

Polar ones look good, just have to work out how much money I want to spend - the S series looks good, can record etc etc

Homer
-13th November 2003, 14:11
There's nothing wrong with thew A series if you just want it to show you're heart rate as you're training.
If you want to splash out a little more, and one that is shall we say a little more asthetically pleasing, go for one of the M series

srb
-13th November 2003, 14:25
If I was replacing mine (cheap sigma one), I would buy a Timex 50 Lap one @ 90.00. Key features outside of heart rate zones I think are important, are water resistance rating, anti scratch glass, and for me; count down timer (with repeat).

srb