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Barry Paul
-31st August 2010, 14:37
For the last 30 years apart from a few of our top committed fencers most British fencers could have inproved their fencing by working on their fitness and footwork. At the recent academy week I think at last British fencing has shown all fencers what is required. At the same time fencers have been able to see that fencing is not after all a magic art but an Olympic sport with much in common with all other sports. Discuss.

Bayston
-31st August 2010, 15:45
Although I agree that footwork is important, I am not as convinced by the arguement regarding fitness. I think as long as you maintain your level of fitness at a state allows you to physically fence the bout(s) without significant loss of energy, then it should not be an issue. The skill in fencing comes from the quality of blade work and foot work etc, and whether you can out smart your opponent. I've never seen a fencing match won based on which fencer was more physically fit?

Rob.Leicester
-31st August 2010, 15:54
If you are fitter you can perform at your best for longer.

Fitness also isn't just how long you can run for. Its how strong your parry is, how fast your extension is, how powerful your lunge is, how balanced you are while moving.

Watch Tarantino v Szilagyi from Luxardo this year, Tarantino is at his fitness limit, Szilagyi isn't. Guess the result.

Watch Iliasz from Baku this year, he didn't win a single match with a score less then 15-12. At least two 15-14 wins. He then won the World Championships. If he wasn't fit, he wouldn't have been able to do that.

Why bother with just having "acceptable" fitness? Compared to point control and footwork, working on your fitness pays the most dividends for the least work. Put the extra work in and make fitness one of your weapons.

I've won matches because I was confident enough in my fitness to be able to move up and down the piste for the whole DE, my opponent could not. By the end I was still executing things effectively and with control, my opponent was falling into his lunges, parrying wide and couldn't retreat fast enough. No-brainer who's going to win that

Fitness matters.

Red
-31st August 2010, 16:17
Although I agree that footwork is important, I am not as convinced by the arguement regarding fitness. I think as long as you maintain your level of fitness at a state allows you to physically fence the bout(s) without significant loss of energy, then it should not be an issue. The skill in fencing comes from the quality of blade work and foot work etc, and whether you can out smart your opponent. I've never seen a fencing match won based on which fencer was more physically fit?

I've made up for technical inability and gone on to win by being much fitter than my opponent on many occasions (foil/epee). In sabre I've certainly lost fights because I've been somewhat lacking in fitness.

If you don't have a certain level of 'movement literacy' (I can't remember the correct term) then you cannot perform the movements required by fencing correctly. This leads to inefficiency in movement and injury. Inefficient movements mean they take more energy and more time to perform. This means you lose to somebody that can do it better.
This may sound like technical ability and so much of S&C directly supports that.

A wise man once said that in fencing you beat people by being brighter than them, being better than them (better technique) and being faster/fitter than them (being able to perform maximally for longer than them). You definitely win if you're better in two of those.
S&C makes you fitter/faster and supports technique. Win-win situation?

Foilling Around
-31st August 2010, 19:04
Although I agree that footwork is important, I am not as convinced by the arguement regarding fitness. I think as long as you maintain your level of fitness at a state allows you to physically fence the bout(s) without significant loss of energy, then it should not be an issue. The skill in fencing comes from the quality of blade work and foot work etc, and whether you can out smart your opponent. I've never seen a fencing match won based on which fencer was more physically fit?

WHAT!!

I'm sorry, but you are kidding yourself!

I have seen nummerous cases where the fencer has lost their sense of timing, reverted to engrained rather than thought out actions, lost body posture and slowed down in footwork due to lack of conditioning.

The S&C work instigated at the academy has the advantage of being tightly targetted at the demands of fencing.

It is just like the quality of your kit. Good eqipment will not make you a better fencer, but poor or poorly maintained equipment will not allow you to use your talents. In the same way, fencing specific fitness will not make you a better fencer, but it will allow you to use you trained abilities to their maximum for a longer period of time. Thus winning more bouts.

Rant over!

Jon Willis
-31st August 2010, 19:17
I've never seen a fencing match won based on which fencer was more physically fit?

oh my! Instead of getting involved I'm jumping on board Paul's rant and instead I will just shake my head in disbelief at that statement.

S&C is the way forward and those who went on the academy course will know how and why.

PS I've also no changed my warm up to the one taught on the academy

foilerist
-31st August 2010, 20:26
my only comment would be that ALL fencers weren't privy to the secret knowledge of the academy's S&C activities.
I would like to be, as I fully accept that fencing athletes would be more effective if their fitness was geared more to the activity.

Is there any way I can get access to what happened, ideas, exercises etc.

coach carson
-31st August 2010, 20:44
Look under British Academy resources on the British Fencing website for an outline of the s&c approach.

The comment above is like saying you don't need fitness to run a marathon. In fact that's right. If you want to run it in 6 hours, don't worry too much about fitness. If you want to run it in around 4 hours, a committed athlete can probably balance work/life to get sufficient hours in. But if you want to run it in under 3 hours, you will have a different level of training to put in.

Don't kid yourselves. Fencing is no different to any other sport. It's not a question of whether you can fence or not. Anyone can fence. It's a question about how high you want to go and whether that is realistic in terms of the quantity and quality of training you are putting in.

Bayston
-31st August 2010, 21:26
Ok having read other peoples posts I do see the other side of the arguement. I did especially like Coach Carsons comments about running a marathon and do agree that if you want to go further you have to put the effort in, including fitness. But I think it is also very much a debate of what level of fencing it should be important! Should it be just the top fencers like those who attended the Accademy course, or should it be everyone.

There is the factor of how you then spread this philosophy accross "all fencers". Fitness is very much a lifestyle choice through diet and exercise, one that not everyone has the time to or is keen to follow. There is the option of implementing it into a training session but I think you then run the risk of alienating the more social fencers from the sport or diverting limited training times away from the actual fencing.

However I have not read up on the Accademy stuff on S&C (to be completly honest I hadn't even heard of it before this discussion) and I was also not present at the course, and so might change my mind after I have read it... but now its time for a McDonalds! :whistle:

randomsabreur
-31st August 2010, 21:38
Strength and conditioning is important in fencing, but equally I don't believe fitness was what limited my ranking at any point in my career. For most of my fencing career I lost to someone who was plain better than me before I got even remotely tired, the only times I was properly worn out was BUSA individuals, where fencing the two pointy weapons was serious hard work (well you try fencing them with marginal point control and a limited number of moves that actually work, most of which are quite defensive - 9 minutes is a long time when you're sitting on a lead fencing defensively for 8 of them as you've overused your only effective attacking move!)

That said, I would have been a "better" fencer if I'd've done more S&C. I would have been able to train more and more effectively. I knew this, I just wasn't motivated enough to improve so I was happy to drift as I was. I hope that the academy is making S&C more "interesting", and is also helping fencers to see the benefits of improved fitness in tangible, rather than theoretical ways.

I used to beat a lot of fencers who were fitter than me (well pretty well everyone was fitter than me!), through scoring most of my hits when my opponents were closing the distance (and taking advantage of their mistakes). With more S&C training I might have developent an attack that worked, or been more proactive in causing the mistakes that i was taking advantage of.

What I do know is that if I come back to competitive fencing, I will be a lot fitter than I was when I left it!

Rob.Leicester
-31st August 2010, 22:03
There is the option of implementing it into a training session but I think you then run the risk of alienating the more social fencers from the sport or diverting limited training times away from the actual fencing.


I think this is a myth. We went from having no fitness program two years ago at Leicester to having a program last year. We didn't see any unusual drop in numbers. If you're sensible with your physical training programs there won't be a problem, obviously we didn't have the fittest fencers doing the same stuff as the more casual less active fencers. We had to put levels into the program.

Also, I often wonder who these "social fencers" are. People do a sport because they want to be a bit more active, that essentially means getting fitter. I don't think I've ever met anyone who only wants to turn up, bout for a bit and then go without trying to improve their training. The only minor resistance we encountered to our new fitness program at the University was from some of the Old Guard who'd got used to how the club was and perhaps were a little afraid of the change. We didn't have a single complaint from any Freshers about the exercises we were doing.

rpryer
-31st August 2010, 22:31
Should it be just the top fencers like those who attended the Accademy course, or should it be everyone.
...
However I have not read up on the Accademy stuff on S&C (to be completly honest I hadn't even heard of it before this discussion) and I was also not present at the course, and so might change my mind after I have read it... but now its time for a McDonalds! :whistle:

If you come down to Chilwell again, grab me and I can run through it with you.

foilerist
-31st August 2010, 23:11
Ok I've read through the S&C resources on the webby, is there any more informative resources other than a power point and some recording sheets.
I'm primarily interested in fencing specific exercises that I can introduce into a regular and not too repetitive pre-fencing routine for a class.

miraberis
-31st August 2010, 23:19
We went from having no fitness program two years ago at Leicester to having a program last year.
...
I don't think I've ever met anyone who only wants to turn up, bout for a bit and then go without trying to improve their training.

Interesting!
Quite the opposite to you, at Southampton around about a year ago we opted to reduce the emphasis on fitness during training sessions. We had limited time and the feeling was that more of it should be spent on technical fencing training and fitness training could be done by those who wanted to do it in their own time.

As for the second part, that sentence perfectly describes about a quarter of the fencers I know.
Most of the rest don't want to improve as much as I think they should, either. If I'm really honest I could do a lot more myself!

In fitness terms I would define a social fencer as someone whose philosophy lies more towards fencing for fitness as opposed to fitness for fencing.

pinkelephant
-1st September 2010, 06:40
I would define a social fencer as someone who views a club night as a social event - usually because of the consequent visit to the pub. Brings back memories...

Foilling Around
-1st September 2010, 08:24
Combining a number of points. We have to identify what we mean by fitness in relation to fencing.

To me it means having the right mobility in the joints etc, having the correct level of power and the appropriate level of aerobic and anaerobic capacity to maintain my optimimun level of fencing to the end of a competition.

It IS specific. Lance Armstrong, the cyclist, ran a marathon. He has one of the highest levels of aerobic fitness in sport and people predicted he would get close to the world record. In the event he ran a good, but not fantastic 2hours 59minutes. His musculature and other body systems were not adapted to the marathon running.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/2006-11-05-marathon-lance_x.htm

The point being that you cannot say that you can run 10K in 40 minutes therefore you will be a good fencer. You have to be fit for the demands of your sport.

Fencers get confused because it is so much a mental game. It is very true that a tactically astute unfit fencer can beat a very fit naiive fencer. However, this usually happens in the early rounds of competitions, because the unfit fencer then blows it in the next fight. You can also say that if you are the same level of technical and tactical ability as your opponent, but they are fitter, they are more likely to win.

RS is getting S&C confused with running round and getting hot and sweaty. Lack of muscle fitness to maintain posture, or to launch a good deep lunge at the end of a 15:14 fight will not show up as panting as blowing. It is however noticable from the side of the piste. You are just not quite as quick, your lunge is just that bit shorter, or you fall forward further.

We should not confuse finishing a fight without being out of breath with still being fit. It is not just our cardiovascular system which is being worked.

I often watch my youngest fencing and if he loses he says he was not tired, so it was not fitness that was the problem. I however can see changes in posture, reaction, tactics which are a result of muscle fatigue. Just like the fact that the second lap of an 800 metre race is often slower than the first, even though they sprint at the end, the winner in fencing in a close fight is often the one whose muscles tire least!

Summary: Fencing fitness is not synonymous with aerobic fitness, so running around getting sweaty is not all you need.

NOTE: I was expecting the video of the Performance Preparation Routine to be on the Academy resources by now, together with Zeimek's lessons. There must be some problems, technical or legal.

Fencing is Fun Scotland
-1st September 2010, 08:32
For Southampton, perhaps it might be an idea to create individualised training plans for your fencers.

Suggestions as to how they could build up fitness training outside of your limited time in the salle as a club.

Or perhaps you could just develop weekly flash mobs of fencers at the gym, or out for a group cycle ride or jog.

Just because the University sports department isn't giving you the hall as a club, doesn't mean to say you can't do things as a group for the motivating effects of camaraderie and mild peer pressure.

And you can always cap off these out-of-hall experiences with the traditional end to social fitness training - a trip to the pub.

You'll only get a core along to these unofficial sessions, but if you can make them fun, regular and effective, I suspect the core will grow.

miraberis
-1st September 2010, 09:18
I don't have the time or inclination to create personal fitness plans for all my fencers. I'm a student myself, not a professional coach. Besides, I don't think it would be very well received by my lot!

Still, there's always the chance of breaking the habit of a lifetime. Perhaps I will try and initiate one or two informal fitness sessions to see what the reception is like.

Foilling Around
-1st September 2010, 09:48
Having attacked this like a rabid dog, I will qualify some of my statements.

Of course massive fitness routines are not for everyone. There is nothing wrong with being a social fencer, enjoying a few hits and having a pint at the end of the night. Saying all fencers should do full on fitnness is like saying pub footballers should be as fit as Premier League ones.

You tailor your fitness to what you want out of the sport. If however you enter event and get frustrated at you results then look at your fencing specific fitness to make the most out of your current level of technical and tactical ability.

And of course you need to keep in miond the needs of your club.

At Sheffield Sword, James Williams ran a 1 hour fitness and footwork session every Thursday before fencing began. However their club night was for 3 hours and they could still fence for 2 hours afterwards. A group of older epeeist tended to stroll in, set up the boxes and just fence; nothing wrong with that. Depending on the club, you need to allow room for all ages, abilites and outlooks.

The academy is looking to instill in young fencers the routines and skills which will speed their progress to Cadet, Junior and Senior Wolrd medals. Not everyone is looking for that, but everyone can take bits from it and adapt it to their needs.

cesh_fencing
-1st September 2010, 09:59
I am in agreement that if you have 2 very closely matched technical/tactical fencers the one who is much fitter is very likely to be the one who comes out as the winner.

However if you have a very fit, technically inferior fencer against a less fit but technically/tactically superior fencer, the technically superior fencer will nearly always win.

To get results at the highest world level, having the full package is invaluable and fitness is of paramount importance as fencers at that level are technically very good so fitness is often the balancing factor, but getting the balance correct is the key especially at earlier stages of development.

When there is a very limited time a young fencer has in a fencing enviroment (as most fencers have in this country) I personally, as a coach, would work on the technical side of fencing and not just run fitness sessions. I feel the general fitness work will be done by those with real dedication outside the fencing enviroment, however the kids involved need the correct guidence to do this correctly.

I am still of the old school that our fencers should do much of this work in 'fun' activities, my favorite when I was young was hockey which is a great aerobic activity as well as swimming etc. These are great for general fitness and help re-balance the body.

Choosing the right S&C is also a very difficult task as no two fencers are identical and a 'one fix fits all' policy/progamme can be dangerous and be injuries waiting to happen especially with kids developing at such differing ages.

S&C is key to reaching the absolute heights of senior international fencing along with great technical ability, however balancing technical training, S&C and the often ignored factor such as School for developing fencers is the absolute key.

rpryer
-1st September 2010, 10:07
I am still of the old school that our fencers should do much of this work in 'fun' activities, my favorite when I was young was hockey which is a great aerobic activity as well as swimming etc. These are great for general fitness and help re-balance the body.

You may think of yourself as old school, but this is exactly what the bang-up-to-date LTAD approach says too.

cesh_fencing
-1st September 2010, 17:11
You may think of yourself as old school, but this is exactly what the bang-up-to-date LTAD approach says too.

Glad that the obvious has come back into fashion.

Fencing is Fun Scotland
-1st September 2010, 18:31
I don't have the time or inclination to create personal fitness plans for all my fencers. I'm a student myself, not a professional coach. Besides, I don't think it would be very well received by my lot!

Still, there's always the chance of breaking the habit of a lifetime. Perhaps I will try and initiate one or two informal fitness sessions to see what the reception is like.

Yes, my post did come through a bit badly phrased.

Much better, as you point out, is to act as an inspiration for them to each create a plan for themselves. Much less time and inclination needed. :)

Mellish
-3rd September 2010, 12:38
It's true that fitness isn't always a winning factor, and I remember reading the bumf on Bill Hoskyns which said he just had an incredibly quick arm, rather than mobility. Everyone has different 'strengths' they bring to bear. However, I have seen plenty of bouts - especially towards the end of the day - lost to poorer fitness. When you become out of breath, not only do you not move as well, as your body struggles with an oxygen deficit, but you can't think as well either. We do a fitness routine at our club, and stretch, and play games.

Fitness in fencing?: Check out the footwork...it's scarier than the blade work. Tell me you can do that carrying an extra 5 kilos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWAEW7Bm3Qc&feature=related

TomA
-3rd September 2010, 13:11
Just glancing through this thread, it seems as though a lot of people are confusing fitness with cardiovascular endurance, which is a part of fitness but not the be all and end all itself. You also have muscular endurance, strength, flexibility, speed and coordination.

I've also seen several comments regarding footwork being more important than fitness. Footwork is fitness. You need to be strong, fast, flexible, coordinated and have good muscular endurance for decent footwork. About the only thing you don't need, except in the later stages of a fight, is cardiovascular endurance.

Mellish
-3rd September 2010, 14:00
There probably is a confusion. Or possibly better put is that there is a crossover between quite a few of these terms. Endurance, muscle conditioning and cardiovascular fitness are all joined at the hip.

As I experience it, if I train hard in say swimming I can swim say 2 kilometres get out of the pool and ride off into the sunset, and this might be called endurance. If I don't train and swim two kilometers, I crawl out of the pool and lie down for half and hour gasping. Like a fish. This would seem like a lack of upper-body cardio-vascular fitness. In one case I'm not gasping, in another I am: so is one endurance and another cardio? Even walking very very slowly up a glacier with a full pack will have you sweating, gasping, vision slipping away before you - unless Marek has been training you as though you were a member of his personal SWAT team.

Muscle conditioning, I would agree is different to cardio-vascular training, but even there there is quite large cross-over, as anyone who is pushing out their last 140 kilo squat or 100 kilo bench press will tell you - in between reps you gasp like a hot dog.

Simply put: at the beginning of the bout, when your conditioning allows, you have no cardio-vascular issues. But as soon as you have pushed your major muscle groups beyond that level, your capacity for endurance comes to an end, and symptoms of cardio vascular stress appear - which also impact on your ability to move and think quickly.

Captchris
-3rd September 2010, 14:00
Personally I've always had a low level of fitness, but my stamina has been top notch. I'm not sure exactly what that indicates!?

mawk
-3rd September 2010, 14:08
unless Marek has been training you as though you were a member of his personal SWAT team.

This genuinely made me smile, so thanks!

Having been a member of said SWAT team in a time distant past I can unequivocally say that I achieved my best results at that time and found I was fencing way, way above what I saw as my 'ability'. Rigorous, structured fitness work really, truly does pay off "as part of a complete fencing workout".

Mellish
-3rd September 2010, 14:44
Best results I ever had too!

The great thing about Marek was his motivational skills - you probably remember the energy he brought to training. Unbelievable. I reckon I've been through some reasonably tough endurance experiences - but the hardest was that night he had the 20 station circuit going. It was even harder than a job I once had stacking bricks from a conveyor belt for several weeks in 40C heat... He just didn't stop until half of us were unconscious with exhaustion. And we loved it!

Mellish
-3rd September 2010, 14:52
Personally I've always had a low level of fitness, but my stamina has been top notch. I'm not sure exactly what that indicates!?

My view on stamina vs cardio vascular fitness: if you have stamina in particular groups of muscles and in using them in a certain way, you will have cardio fitness for that activity as well. Mostly it's muscle specific. If you train as runner, you'll still be puffed out after three laps of a pool, even if you can run 10 miles. And visa versa. If you do a lot of aerobics, you will get overall leg conditioning, but as cardio training for running, it won't be as effective just running.

What sort of stamina do you mean? My physio tells me old blokes like us are tougher than the younger chaps - and I think this is mental. I suspect, through much practice, we can put up with more misery...;)

Captchris
-3rd September 2010, 15:33
Let's take the lamented shuttle run... When doing it at school and then a few years later, I found that I believed I would be out fairly early. However, for whatever reason, I lasted a lot lot longer than I realised.

andylymn
-3rd September 2010, 17:50
I was able to see the first day of the academy training but due to other obligations couldn't see the next day. I think that this debate will run on for a while. Fortunately, I coach athletics and gymnastics and all my children have taken part in these activities. Strength and conditioning is important along with general fitness training. Of course fencing specifics have to be realised. Some have innate speed and reflex. Others have the strategic/cognitive skills needed to read what opponents moves are. Some have a variety of swordsmanship skills that they can employ at different times whilst others have more limited moves but are very effective using them.

The essence of S & C is that it complements the other skills. The age old use of bleep tests might relate a fencers durability and base fitness which is required over longer competitions but does it really have specific impact on the anaerobic lactate system that is more intent with fencing. The ability to build up a tolerance and condition this system so that the body can remove the by products of this kind of exercise more effectively is very important.

An article in the sword a year or more ago related the key points for training young fencers. They were gymnastics, athletics, swimming and running. The key to me is the ability to develop speed, endurance and flexibility at a rate the fencers body can tolerate. This is the physical conditioning but it also develops mental fortitude. Along side this there needs to be the fencing specific component that develops the skills of fencing.

With younger fencers it is necessary to find out exactly what else they do activities wise both extra-curricular and in school. If people fence only once a week then trying to accommodate all these components is quite difficult. If fencers undertake other activities then it is sometimes easier for the coach to see these differences. Unfortunately, it does take more time to plan these activities or to analyse their effects.

Other components are also just as important. There was a statement that there is no place for static stretching in warm up. This is to some extent true. It is more so for more dynamic events like sprinting or the cut and thrust of fencing. However, it did say in warm up. There is a place for static stretching as a separate session and also as part of the cool down.

In essence any activity needs to have correct physical preparation.It not only enhances the fencers ability but aids injury prevention and or recovery as well as general recovery.

If anyone wants any ideas for conditioning let me know and I'll see what I can provide

Mellish
-6th September 2010, 11:43
An article in the sword a year or more ago related the key points for training young fencers. They were gymnastics, athletics, swimming and running.

In these there are both upper and lower body cardio and conditioning - a bit of everything. Also a lot of flexibility with gymnastics - especially when there is a floorwork component.

I think fencing could also learn a lot from the fitness regime of boxing - with modification: it's a fighting sport with many similarities. Marek was always keen on skipping and medicine ball work, and I personally found these exercises helped alot. A lot of the benefit was not so much the muscle work out - but the rapid movement involved. With medicine ball there is a constant eye, hand, whole-body co-ordination required. Skipping is very close to the hopping footwork many high ranked fencers adopt. I've also tried a fencing version of a 'bag workout', that is, a tennis ball on a long string, so that you follow the ball in and out of its pendulum.

If I had time, money and youth, my dream weekly programme would be: circuits (3-4x); skipping (5-6x); fartlek (or otherwise alternate sprinting and jogging) (3k 5x); tennisball work (5x); static fencing arm practice (5x); footwork (5x); yoga (3x); three fencing lessons a week; four nights of fencing, and; weekly comps! Come on Lottery numbers...

Cloudy
-6th September 2010, 17:04
If I had time, money and youth, my dream weekly programme would be: circuits (3-4x); skipping (5-6x); fartlek (or otherwise alternate sprinting and jogging) (3k 5x); tennisball work (5x); static fencing arm practice (5x); footwork (5x); yoga (3x); three fencing lessons a week; four nights of fencing, and; weekly comps! Come on Lottery numbers...

I read that and wonder where you have your recovery time penciled in.

Mellish
-7th September 2010, 12:39
I read that and wonder where you have your recovery time penciled in.

One day a week complete rest is (or should be) factored in.

But the training intensity should vary too. e.g. one day a week (or fortnight) is hard, others not. The training duration can be modified to be harder or lighter: so a programme can be designed to make you peak at a set time in the year - say nationals - by building duration and intensity. Also several days to a week of complete rest prior to high profile events.

purple
-24th September 2010, 10:11
That said, I would have been a "better" fencer if I'd've done more S&C. I would have been able to train more and more effectively. I knew this, I just wasn't motivated enough to improve so I was happy to drift as I was. I hope that the academy is making S&C more "interesting", and is also helping fencers to see the benefits of improved fitness in tangible, rather than theoretical ways.

And this is the important bit. This is the bit that's bloody hard to get across. Yes, fencing is a skills based sport. Those skills are dependant on your physical ability to execute those actions. An attack is an attack, a parry is a parry. Being "quicker" than your opponent is a trainable skill, both physically and mentally. Work on training those skills, along with your fencing ability and the results are tangible. Just look at any world class fencer, it's not all time spent with a weapon in hand.

Wolfman35
-6th October 2010, 09:13
Are there any dvd's available in the category of S & C???

If so could anyone advise me please.

I still use my fitness and training programme that I used to adhere to when in the Armed Forces, Is this still good to adhere to or is there any further advice anyone could give to me please.

S&C Guy
-30th October 2010, 09:37
Hello everyone!

I am one of the S&C coaches from the Academy camp and have continued to provide support for a number of fencers since, as well as just returning from MX Fencing's camp down in Sevenoaks this week.

I have read through most of the posts here and i have to say Foiling Arounds thoughts on the topic are pretty much bang on so i do not want to repeat what he and some of the other people on here have said too much (By the way Paul its great to see you've remembered so much of Anthony and my own ramblings from our conversations during the week! There were points i was worried we had swamped you). Also a big thanks to Jonny Willis for clarifying his thoughts on training and steak! So as not to write a huge essay on here about S&C for fencing i thought i would instead make myself available for any questions you guys might have. I was hoping more of the Academy stuff would be up by now as i know the videos are finished but seeing as its taking longer than expected i appreciate slides with very little writing on them and some videos of Jon doing the Performance Prep without sound are not going to provide all the answers required.

If you have any specific questions post on here and i will do my best to get back to you asap. Should anything require a longer response not suited to a forum post i will try and provide you with the info in a more suitable location! Hope this helps everyone, look forward to hearing from you.

Rhys I