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Rob.Leicester
-1st September 2010, 13:44
So branching from the other thread came the discussion of the importance of varied and properly organised S&C program, so what stuff do you do individually or at your clubs to do this?

At Leicester we've got our fitness program working in levels. For our beginners who're just starting out we do a basic jogging warm up with stretches and some very basic plyometric exercise all followed by footwork. Its nothing too tough and doesn't take longer then about 20 minutes. Essentially just a warm up really that'll get people a bit fitter over time.

For the Team and the more competitive fencers we take people out on the track as a group and do some laps and sprinting exercises during sessions. We also encourage people to get together in little teams who go to the gym together, making sure each team has someone who's got a bit of experience, knows what they're doing with the weights and can guide people in what they're doing.

We felt that if we kept a bit of structure with the gym sessions that people would be more likely to keep at it if they were working with friends and team mates.

Rudd
-1st September 2010, 14:25
The club does some varied stuff.

Usually classes start with some intu flow (http://www.intu-flow.com/) exercises.
There is a specific competition warm up that is always done.. It involves dynamic stretching and general warm up exercises.

Conditioning includes body weight exercises, skipping (everyone was required to get a rope) and some weight training. The club has some barbells and kettlebells. There is also a lot of footwork based conditioning some time combined with other exercises. This varies in frequency and intensity during the season but is often two to three days per week.

Personally I run (a fast 2 miles maybe once a week or a longer distance up to 5 miles every few weeks). The majority of my strength and conditioing training is with kettlebells as I train from home. I also do a fair bit of yoga and joint mobility work as I'm old and sore. If you are interested I blog about it here. (http://fit2fence.blogspot.com/)

When I had a gym membership I used to do more traditional weight training but I've that absolute strength is of minimum importance and that specific conditioning combined with rehab and mobility work and some strength training really pays dividends.

grs
-1st September 2010, 17:33
..... jogging warm up with stretches and some very basic plyometric exercise all followed by footwork. Its nothing too tough and doesn't take longer then about 20 minutes. Essentially just a warm up really that'll get people a bit fitter over time.

Sorry warm-up is ambiguous and not politically correct........The correct words are 'performance preparation' and running around is considered counter productive. You will have to wait and see BF's video of the 'performance preparation' which is deemed suitable for all performers and will soon be published on the NA site. :)

Rob.Leicester
-1st September 2010, 17:48
Sorry warm-up is ambiguous and not politically correct........The correct words are 'performance preparation' and running around is considered counter productive. You will have to wait and see BF's video of the 'performance preparation' which is deemed suitable for all performers and will soon be published on the NA site. :)

I know about the performance preparation stuff done at the Academy, but as the jogging serves the purpose of increasing overall fitness of our beginners as opposed to warming up exact muscle groups for the purpose of fencing I felt warm-up was a suitable word.

With beginners we're not doing the level of explosive or powerful movements with them, that I would be at a competition. As such I feel jogging is a good compromise between getting everyone moving together and getting a little bit fitter at the same time.

We teach much better and more focussed preparation to the fencers who are getting competitive and getting the idea.

Rudd
-1st September 2010, 18:21
Sorry warm-up is ambiguous and not politically correct........The correct words are 'performance preparation' and running around is considered counter productive. You will have to wait and see BF's video of the 'performance preparation' which is deemed suitable for all performers and will soon be published on the NA site. :)

I presume your first statement is meant to be lighthearted.

Nothing wrong with jogging as PART of a warm-up. It serves the function of elevating heart rate and preparing the body for what is to come. The important thing is that jogging isn't the only thing you do nor that it makes up the majority of your preparatory work.

grs
-1st September 2010, 19:47
I presume your first statement is meant to be lighthearted.

:yesyes:

As a coach I have been on the receiving end of many forms of expert advice in preparation for fencing. Every few years I have been told that one form of exercise or another is wrong; only to be told a few years later exactly the opposite. I am not an S&C expert, etc. I have always used common sense in preparation for both beginners and athletes.

What I am saying is that the methodology behind the exercises undertaken during the national academy needs to be seen and understood before judgement is made. Hence watch the video when it is released or talk to the athletes/performance coaches who were at the NA.

bumping another thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by rpryer
You may think of yourself as old school, but this is exactly what the bang-up-to-date LTAD approach says too.

answer from a younger oldy than me :rolleyes:
Glad that the obvious has come back into fashion.

Rudd
-1st September 2010, 19:59
I agree that sport and fitness like everything else is affected by fads and fashions. Take static stretching for example. For years the position has been don't use it pre-event as it reduces power production and performance. Now it coming back in to vogue.

I'm looking forward to seeing what the NA produce and glad to see if being made publicly available. Will the presentation only covering warm-up, oops I meant performance prep, or will it also cover strength and conditioning work.

S&C Guy
-30th October 2010, 11:21
Hello everyone, i just thought i'd dip in this thread and mention that should any of you have specific questions about the S&C support for the Academy or the Performance Preperation so expertly demonstrated by Jon Willis then feel free to post them up on this thread;

http://fencingforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14259&page=2

I will try and answer as many questions as possible about what we did.

I will also briefly mention that using jogging around to raise the heart rate prior to a warm up/Performance Prep (I try not to get bogged down in terminology) is not required. Jogging will definately raise your heart rate and get your blood flowing to the muscles but it will be flowing to the muscles required for jogging! Swimmers do not jog prior to their warm up, nor do cyclists, so there is no reason to do this in fencing either. I strongly recommend you give the Performance Prep a try yourself and see how you feel at the end of it, or send Jon Willis a message asking for his opinion on it. When we first presented it to him he said there was no way it would work if he didn't jog around first. When he tried it and tested it by performing some fast footwork and lunge patterns he realised that there was no need to add a jog in at the start.

Hope this helps,

Rhys I