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mayoM
-28th January 2004, 03:13
What exactly is beating the blade? And when yould you use it?

hokers
-28th January 2004, 10:27
Beating the blade is used to gain right of way. Not sure of the exact text of the rules, but basically it has to be a contact of the blades aimed at knocking your opponent's blade aside, and has to meet the top half of the blade (foible).

If it meets the lower half, it looks much more like a parry from your opponent, and you will lose right of way. It should be an action made with the fingers, hence a smaller movement, as if you look for the blade and don't find it, you are also likely to lose right of way.

mayoM
-29th January 2004, 01:13
just to make the question more complicated, shouldn't you always try to beat the blade then? If you hit the lower half and it counts as a parry, you didn't have the right of way in the first place so you can't really lose what you dant have in the first place

Next, if I have the right of way, and someone is trying to beat my blade, what do I do? do I try to parry it?

hokers
-29th January 2004, 09:14
No you shouldnt always try at as your fencing will become very predictable. Just as good to begin the attack first and gain ROW like that. If someone tries to beat your blade, either avoid it or beat back immediately. Or realise that a beat is very likely followed by a step lunge, so retreat out of distance and let your opponent fall short.

ceprab
-2nd February 2004, 11:20
Not a ref but...

To add to the rule about the top half, better to try for the top third to make sure it is really clear that you haven't been parried (and it will still go against you sometimes).

My coach's advice (to beginners at least, and seeing as you had to ask the question ;) ) is basically not to bother with beats. Seems sensible to me.

(cue horde of proper sabreurs lining up to play 'slap the dilettante epeeist')

randomsabreur
-2nd February 2004, 16:17
If you are attacking anyway a beat is an unnecessary complication in most situations, unless you want to trigger a reaction from your opponent, like a parry or a counter attack. In general, stick to the least complicated move that works, as there is less to get wrong and less opportunity for the move to be misinterpreted! If you don't need a beat to get priority or make the hit easier, don't give the opponent the opportunity to retake priority by deceiving your beat. Then again, if the opponent already has priority, e.g. you've just missed them, or been parried, then a beat counter on the preparation can be very useful, but if done too often is too predictable.

mayoM
-4th February 2004, 19:55
Funny, just learned to beat the blade when in point in line.

Maybe I'm missing out on something, but I find beating the blade useless (unless the other person has a point in line) in fact, is that the only time you beat their blade?

whizzkid1982
-4th February 2004, 22:58
beats can be very useful when you are using point in line, either from you r or when you do it to them off it.

fencer A has point in line out. fencer B beats blade. fencer A knows fencer B is probably about to launch final long simple action so ca\n move out way or parry.

if you have pointy in line out people do not expect you to go looking for their blade. they expect you to simply retreat. so offer a PIL then as oppent steps forward beat their blade and hit them.
sows seeds of doubt in opponents mind even if it doesn't work and can allow you to get easy stop hit in a couple of points time.

oiuyt
-5th February 2004, 19:20
Beats are useful in a number of situations. Probably the most common situation in sabre is a simul attack right off the fence command. Add a beat and suddenly you're scoring the touch.

Beats are frequently used as a parry when one's opponent is in chase mode but still far enough out that s/he cannot safely finish.

Beats can be used to refresh a chasing attack that is starting to run out of steam (only so far that the arm/blade can continue going out, the beat allows for a partial restarting of that distance).

A beat right as your opponent appears about to shift from preparation to attack helps to demonstrate to the ref that you've definitively got ROW and should get the call (making it easy for the referee to award you a touch is a Good Thing).

etc.

-B :)

uk_45
-8th February 2004, 17:34
But to many beats i.e contastnly beating then hitting and your opponent will wise up and just dodge the blade.

UglyBug
-8th February 2004, 20:56
Yes, but that applies to anything - too many attacks to head and they start to parry etc.! In my case, too many parry repostes, people stop going into them...