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Eponym
-29th October 2010, 06:48
I'm not a bad fencer but I could be better. The problem is that for a long while I did not do any sports at all so I took on some weight and have what you'd call love handles. I am doing decent at sabre right now but I feel I need to get better and tougher before I can do championships again and competitions and all that. My university has a gym room with machines, which ones are best? Legs or what? Thanks! Any advice is really really appreciated. I have to admit I want to get in shape to impress the ladies too... ;)

hokers
-29th October 2010, 09:55
Man, you start a lot of threads.

Cardio for love handles. Lots and lots of cardio. Different objective for fencing, lots of lean, fast-twitch muscle. Read the S+C articles in here for a good overview.

Mr long sword
-29th October 2010, 10:12
Eat a little move alot..!! simple. That's how I've kept a slender physique..

Surely your french accent is enough to impress the ladies..?!? (you are the french guy/gal right..?)

Rudd
-29th October 2010, 15:41
Fat loss starts at the table. Think of it this way. It takes you about 30 minutes to burn 300 calories on a treadmill. You can eat 300 calories in about two minute e.g. a mars bar. You need to alter your diet to support your goals.

have a read of this series of articles "Fat Loss for Athletes."

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/fat-loss-for-athletes-part-1.html

For some reason I cannot use the link button any more.

Jon Willis
-29th October 2010, 16:24
Cardio for love handles. Lots and lots of cardio.

Cardio will work but if you lift weights that will do the trick. Muscle is hungry and you will burn fat as you sleep (your body building muscle)

4 sets of 12's, eat egg white and you will be on the road to 'look good naked' (could also help your fencing)

Eponym
-29th October 2010, 17:44
Cardio will work but if you lift weights that will do the trick. Muscle is hungry and you will burn fat as you sleep (your body building muscle)

4 sets of 12's, eat egg white and you will be on the road to 'look good naked' (could also help your fencing)

Thank you. Why so much egg white? Don't people get gas from egg white?

munkey
-29th October 2010, 19:04
Thank you. Why so much egg white? Don't people get gas from egg white?

Egg white = high protein, low fat & carbs. Ideal for building muscle.

Other foods are higher in protein but may contain more fat and carbs. On the plus side they're probably tastier and less likely to make you fart.

As for what to do in the gym, a more balanced approach might be advisable if going to the gym is a novel experience for you. If you have an hour available, 10 minutes to warm up and dynamic stretches, 20 minutes aerobic exercise (treadmill, bike, stair climber, cross trainer, rowing machine - you choose), 20 minutes resistance/weight training (3 sets of 8-10 reps, 1 exercise per muscle group), 5 minutes core stability and a 5 minute cool down and static stretch will do wonders for you if you do it 3 times a week.

Have fun!

Regards

Munkey

DSSabre
-23rd November 2010, 14:22
Jon,

NOt sure thats really going to help with the look good naked thing

DS

Spider5
-23rd November 2010, 19:16
Egg white = high protein, low fat & carbs. Ideal for building muscle.

Other foods are higher in protein but may contain more fat and carbs. On the plus side they're probably tastier and less likely to make you fart.

As for what to do in the gym, a more balanced approach might be advisable if going to the gym is a novel experience for you. If you have an hour available, 10 minutes to warm up and dynamic stretches, 20 minutes aerobic exercise (treadmill, bike, stair climber, cross trainer, rowing machine - you choose), 20 minutes resistance/weight training (3 sets of 8-10 reps, 1 exercise per muscle group), 5 minutes core stability and a 5 minute cool down and static stretch will do wonders for you if you do it 3 times a week.

Have fun!

Regards

Munkey

Like the outline but 20 minutes of cardio is little more than a warmup and doing endurance exercises and strengthening exercises on the same session could be a bit of a conflict of goals.If weight loss is a priority, wouldn't it be better to split the program with 30-40 minutes of cardio on 2 days and weights on the other day? That way more time could be spent on each type of exercise with recovery time inbetween.

UglyBug
-28th November 2010, 23:35
Jon,

NOt sure thats really going to help with the look good naked thing

DS

Is this waiting for a poll as to who we would rather see naked? JW or DS?

S&C Guy
-8th January 2011, 22:15
Like the outline but 20 minutes of cardio is little more than a warmup and doing endurance exercises and strengthening exercises on the same session could be a bit of a conflict of goals.If weight loss is a priority, wouldn't it be better to split the program with 30-40 minutes of cardio on 2 days and weights on the other day? That way more time could be spent on each type of exercise with recovery time inbetween.

Sorry late in on this thread, but hey its January so i imagine lots of people will be thinking about losing some body fat!

I'd agree with 20mins cardio being more than a warm up, but i'm not sure i'd recomend increasing the amount over the week. Few thoughts on steady state cardio (especially when Fencing performance is a consideration!):

-Long steady state cardio burns very little body fat (bf) for the time investment, especially if your diet that day hasn't been great. Long distance runners have surprisingly high bf%, they are small because they also have very little muscle mass. Sprinters are incredibly lean and have large muscle mass!

- Long steady state cardio can negatively affect your cortisol/testosterone ratio (this is also important for woman). Cortisol is your stress hormone, it can lead to slowed recovery, poor sleep quality, breakdown in muscle mass (especially Type II's, fast twitch) and numerous other negative issues. Fencers need to be alert, fast, powerful and happy, not tired, slow, weak and sad!

- You can lose some bf from steady state cardio but the time investment it requires stops you doing other things with your training time like blade skills and footwork.

Jon Willis hit the nail on the head when he said muscle is hungry tissue, it constantly burns calories. If i had 3 sessions a week i would focus on structural balance and recovery from my fencing sessions and increasing strength/power. Then if some fat loss is required use a finisher. 10-15minutes on something that gets the heart rate going, like intervals on a rower, sprints or a circuit of your choice with weights, bodyweight exercises, anything else your creativity can come up with! The key to remeber is this is a finisher not the whole session! Plus if your fencing training or life in general means your tired, then go recover rather than breaking yourself down more and again increasing your cortisol levels!

Hope this helps!

S&C Guy
-9th January 2011, 13:05
Oh i forgot to add as well, that Rudd is absolutely right when he said it all starts at the table too! You can't out train a bad diet. When your diet is at 90% or more healthy food and your training your fencing and strength regularly, if your still not seeing you bf% dropping then you can start to add in some extra cardio work to burn some more calories.

AELLA
-25th January 2011, 11:07
Then if some fat loss is required use a finisher. 10-15minutes on something that gets the heart rate going, like intervals on a rower...

S&C Guy,Really interesting, do you think you can do a complete session on a rower? I have seen rowing for rugby programmes on the Concept II could you briefly describe how a rowing for fencing prog would look?I really love the rower, as it's a full body machine, that has little / no impact.Would be really awesome if I could row more AND improve my fencing.

Andy
-28th January 2011, 15:32
S&C Guy,Really interesting, do you think you can do a complete session on a rower? I have seen rowing for rugby programmes on the Concept II could you briefly describe how a rowing for fencing prog would look?I really love the rower, as it's a full body machine, that has little / no impact.Would be really awesome if I could row more AND improve my fencing.

I also like the rowing machine, and I'm sure that a rowing for fencing session could be developed, but it depends on where you are in your training cycle as to what you need to be doing, also it depends on how fit you are as well.
(I'll email you)

A.

S&C Guy
-30th January 2011, 00:09
S&C Guy,Really interesting, do you think you can do a complete session on a rower? I have seen rowing for rugby programmes on the Concept II could you briefly describe how a rowing for fencing prog would look?I really love the rower, as it's a full body machine, that has little / no impact.Would be really awesome if I could row more AND improve my fencing.

Ok so let me say first of all this is purely with the goal of losing some stubborn body fat rather than getting fit for fencing. As i have said numerous times on this site, getting fit for fencing needs to be done on the piste in conjunction with strength/power training. This way the time investment you make gives you the bigges 'bang for your buck' as opposed to non-specific fitness training that has little carry over. For some tips on fencing specifc conditioning check my last post on the 'General Fitness Training' thread.

Having said that, i like the rower as its a full body exercise, an easy skill to do right and low impact for the joints which is vitally important when refering to overweight individuals!!! Where as rowing fitness is unlikely to have much benfit for fencing fitness, it can end up being detrimental if done wrong. This is due to the different muscle fibre types we have. You may have heard of fast and slow twitch muscle fibres, fencers require fast twitch dominance due to the explosive nature of the sport! Training in a slow and steady way to lose fat will promote dominance of slow twitch fibres and no one wants to be a slow-thin fencer!

Therefore i would perform intervals on the rower, with the high intensity sections being no longer than 30 seconds (i would like shorter but 30 is easiest due to the Concept II's inbuilt functions). Concepts II has a preset interval timer of 30 seconds work and 30 seconds rest as its shortest interval. This is a great option, go flat out for 30 and then try and catch your breath for 30 and repeat. I would recomend taking a percentage of your first intervals distance and stoping once you fall below this percentage. For example;

Interval 1 = 175m (-10% = 175-18 = 157m, try and go over 157m each time)
Interval 2 = 174
Interval 3 = 171
....Interval 6 = 158
Interval 7 = 155m, STOP, lie on the floor holding down your lunch and then go sleep!

The 10% rule is a good way of making sure it stays reasonably powerful relative to an unfatigued performance. First time you try this session you may get to 3 intervals, next time try and get 4 done, then 5, 6... 10 and so on. If you can repeat this 20 times i imagine you'll be a lot more lean than the first time you attempted it so go and hit the piste instead! The best i've seen on this is 33 intervals in an internation youth rugby flanker player preseason!

Also if you have an iPhone check out the 'Gymboss Interval Timer' app, its free (Alternatively you can buy a Gymboss Interval Timer unit on Amazon for about $15) You can set your own time periods on these and be more creative with your sessions, jest keep it under 30s work and try and do work:rest ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 etc. (If your working hard enough in your work periods, having 4 times the amount of rest still doesn't feel loong enough!!!)

With fatloss you have to do what keeps you healthy and motivated so get creative but for the sake of this site, keep it to something that will benefit your fencing and understand the goal, to perform on the piste optimally! A last thought too, without the advanced body fat measuring devices available to you or a very experienced person with calipers, weighing scales are not a good way to judge progress! Muscle ways more than fat, following my advice you should be packing on some decent muscle density (not the same as size and not worth going into now!) so the scales may be going up whilst bf% goes down! Take photos of yourself and use the mirror to judge your progress. It can be humbling but in the long run it is healthier and much more likely to keep you sane!!!

Good luck, Rhys

brigadeir998
-4th December 2011, 21:17
For a fencer, I think that carbs and protein are quite important. The proteins are delivered through fish and seafood and carbs through whole grain and whole wheat foods

Lee Spiers
-6th December 2011, 21:21
I just eat KFC and do press ups.

Foilling Around
-6th December 2011, 22:34
I just eat KFC and do press ups.

Just be careful where you put the KFC whilst doing the press ups or it could all end in tears.

Rdb811
-6th December 2011, 23:06
I just eat KFC and do press ups.

I thought Kingston's numbers were down a bit.

Agricola
-17th January 2012, 10:36
Squats and lunges are a given for fencing, for doing the squats I stand over a trunk no higher than a coffe table and with hands behind my head squat until my backside touches it then return to standing. Start eating porridge for breakfast (no sugar!) and soups for meals (no bread!) and if you feel hungry eat an apple, getting tired of those apples and don't feel like eating another? Then you can't be THAT hungry can you? Fizzy drinks are banned and are poison to the body no matter what shape you're in, stop boozing and allow one night a week to have a few drinks.

I lost over 5 stone in less than a year but I don't attribute it to diet and exercise I lost the weight through will power and self control. Remember there's always one last fail safe workout routine, you put your hands on the edge of the dinner table and PUSH!!!

;)

jedtom
-13th February 2012, 08:10
my 2 rule diet
#1 choose one rule that will make a difference but keep it!! (it's only ONE rule) - suggestions: No flour, No oil, No eating after 7 PM... You know yourself. Which one rule will make a trmendous difference?

#2 Remeber that your goal is to lose weight - You're doing it for yourself. Even if chocolate ice cream is allowed, Don't pig out

Good luck

jjefferies
-26th December 2016, 03:40
you may not want to chat about this and you probably was expecting someone to ask you this question but do you HONESTLY believe in Jesus Christ and all of his magic tricks?
??
Did my browser just do some kind of meme warp and throw me into a different universe?
Or is this a thread hijack and we should throw up our hands or be shot.
In all honesty I don't mind chatting about anything including Jesus though I don't know anything about magic tricks.
But as far as obesity and fencing go, my coach always told me that as long as you can handle the weight it's not an issue.
I have learned where it(weight) is an issue is in longevity in the knees and feet. Presently I am suffering plantar fasciitis which I think would be lessened by weight loss. The concept is good but implementation is being a bear. At 72, trying to pare a few pounds/stone/kilos has been an issue and I seem stuck in the 200lb/14.28stone/90.7kg range. Just keeping it off at Christmas is a real trick.

But back to the OP's question, it would probably make you feel better and look better if you were less pear shaped. I know it would me. But for fencing, well the added weight makes a little more difficult to make the forward/reverse movement change easily and that's an issue.

Gav
-28th December 2016, 19:26
It was a spammer. Please don't encourage them.