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Gold
-9th April 2003, 10:32
I was wondering what exactly is the difference in life time between the Paul's normal and lightweight sabre lames. Should i just use my lightweight lame for competition:shrug:

Gold
-10th April 2003, 14:27
Ok ill talk to myself then:confused:

Barry Paul
-10th April 2003, 17:56
They haven't been in use long enough to give you an answer. I haven't seen any of our light weight lame with a tear in, so they seem to be strong enough. I think they might give from the same to 75% less legal life than a standard Leon Paul Lame.

Gold
-11th April 2003, 14:57
Cheers Barry ill get back to you when mine finally bites the dust, hopefully never;)

YeOlde Armourer
-16th April 2003, 12:54
A lame will only last as long has it's taken care of . I have lame that are 30 years old and still passing. Clean them with a 1/2 capful of woolite and 1/2 capful of ammoina in cold water and rinse them off in cold water and let it drip dry.

Tim

kingkenny
-16th April 2003, 14:19
Its most important to dry them after use (when they are Sweaty)
leave them on a radiator.

Trust me on this being sweaty has ruined many a lame jacket and many a potential date. Dam.:eek:

Roman Brenda
-21st April 2003, 21:31
I would counsel against putting a lame onto a radiator. It would be better to hang the lame above a radiator.

Jambo
-24th April 2003, 12:31
Does anyone know if the gofence TCA sabre lame's are any good?

bydande
-24th April 2003, 23:09
The gofence sabre lame is made from similar material to the LP lame. TCA hold the US patent on the material - and if you speak to TCA they will claim that LP stole the material design from them. I'm sure LP will claim it was the other way round - so who can tell. Anyway, apart from that snippet of gossip I do know one person (a girl at West Fife fencing club) who bought one of the TCA lames from gofence. I spoke to her just after she bought it and she seemed very happy with it then - but I havent seen her for a while so cant say what her current feeling about it are.

Personally, I have one of the TCA Ultralight foil lames from gofence which I am very happy with. Its light, very slick and you certainly seem to get more freedom of movement in it than a traditional lame.

bydande

Jambo
-25th April 2003, 09:39
Cheers. I've actually got a Duellist lame on order, but with France lames going bust I've been waiting ages, thinking about getting one elsewhere. The LP lightweight is v expensive though.

bydande
-25th April 2003, 12:35
If you add the TCA lame to your shopping cart on the gofence.com website it will tell you whether they have it in stock or not - as they have integrated stock monitoring and reporting.

I thought the TCA sabre lame I looked at was really cool especially the stretch panels on the shoulders and flanks - I am not sure if the LP lightweight sabre lame has these. It was almost enough to get me doing sabre - almost, but not quite.

pTeppic
-19th May 2003, 00:03
Originally posted by bydande
If you add the TCA lame to your shopping cart on the gofence.com website it will tell you whether they have it in stock or not - as they have integrated stock monitoring and reporting.


I must admit I'm impressed with the stock monitoring and reporting - I like it alot. Hey Barry, if your reading why not see about something similar on the LP site?

Would make life easier knowing whether our gear is going to take three days or three milenia to arrive ;)

Kian Ryan

neevel
-19th May 2003, 01:28
I've not seen the Leon Paul lightweight lame yet, but the Triplette Lames have been on the market for about 10 years on my side of the pond, so I can relay my experience with them (both as a tournament armorer and with some I've had as club stock).

The practical lifespan turns out to be about the same as a stainless lame, but the chief failure mode is different. The fabric will hold it's conductivity longer, but it is relatively brittle and prone to getting tears and fraying, especially at the seams (think of how a hand-knitted sweater can unravel and you've got the idea). Once it gets a hole, the damage will start to propagate, and the only way I've found to reliably arrest that is to securely sew a patch of ordinary lame material on over the damaged area ASAP. So the upshot is that it'll fail due to physical damage in about the same timespan that a conventional lame will fail due to loss of conductivity.

They can also develop areas of high resistance due to dried sweat salts (or spilled juice) making an insulating layer over the fabric, but washing typically clears that up.

For the ones with the stretch panels, the conductive stretch fabric is quite prone to getting snagged and torn. The location of that panel (at the back on the unarmed-hand side) keeps it out of harm's way in sabre, but foil flicks landing there can cause damage. You also need to be carful about leaning back against surfaces or protruberances that could catch and cause a snag.

-Dave

kingkenny
-19th May 2003, 11:46
I must admit I'm impressed with the stock monitoring and reporting - I like it alot. Hey Barry, if your reading why not see about something similar on the LP site?
Stop trying to make my life more difficult. :dizzy:

The trouble with a stock monitoring systems is its easy when you only have a small stock, don’t have a wide range of products and or you only import products rather than manufacture them all yourself. When you have 803 products (I just counted) in the pricelist as apposed to 82 then it becomes a continual counting job and its time better spent making new products or designing new equipment. (Or messing around on a forum.)

Gav
-19th May 2003, 11:52
You could incorporate a bar code scanner into the equation to speed things up. My girlfriend works in a joke shop ("There's nothing funny about jokes!"). They cary hundreds of products running into loads of very different product lines. Items are scanned in when the shipment arrives and scanned out when they're sold. Stock control! Easy Peasy. It even has thresholds set so that it sets up for the next order.

Of course when your manager is completely IT illiterate and doesn't even understand the concept of bar codes then inevitably there are problems however the idea is sound/

kingkenny
-19th May 2003, 11:59
But then you have to stick a bar code on to an epee point?
Sounds good for jackets and masks but when a sword can be made up with 6 different parts it gets 100 different combinations so lots of bar codes?

Is it expensive? If you have any info send me it more out of curiosity. Did you here about the guy who used to hold the bar code scanner between his legs in between customers, he got cancer of the balls. Not nice but that might be an urban myth or a rural legend.

Gav
-19th May 2003, 12:54
Hi KingKenny,


Don't stick the barcode on the Epee point - stick it on a box of Epee points and each time you take out 1 Epee point you scan the the barcode. Alternatively you set up a 'cheat sheet" which details lots of different barcodes and when you are packing, shipping, selinhg (through the shop) you scan the bar code off the sheet. Staff education is the key. It initially seems daunting to them (loads of barcodes) and initially I'd say there'd be a few mistakes. Once people get used to it then it moves along quite swiftly and is an improvement (to the staff) over writing down everything.


I don't have any info to hand [I don't work in e-pos] but I'll ask my girlfriend how much it cost to put in when I see her tonight - I don't think it was cheap.

ps She works in a small business so it can't be THAT expensive.

kingkenny
-19th May 2003, 12:59
Don't stick the barcode on the Epee point - stick it on a box of Epee points and each time you take out 1 Epee point you scan the the barcode I was only joking but then you have to count all the epee points that you make to keep it accurate. As a system for organising prices and making dispatch and shop time quicker sounds good but as for stocks not so sure?

bydande
-19th May 2003, 13:06
So - do the last few entries in this thread explain why I have recently heard a number of stories about people ordering LP kit and then having to wait ages to actually get the stuff.

Is LP having problems keeping up with the success of James Bond in publicising fencing?

Gav
-19th May 2003, 13:16
Bydande: Play nice. ;)

Kingkenny: D'oh - sense of humour breakdown. To be honest I wasn't sure so I stuck that in anyway. Don't you have a standard amount of Epee tips in a box [say 100]?

bydande
-19th May 2003, 13:28
Gav,
"Work Nice - Play Nice" doesnt really have a ring to it.

:party:

kingkenny
-19th May 2003, 14:41
more like 1000 and you have 4 types of epee point made in to the complete thing by three separate processes so it stars become large numbers of small bits in boxs quite soon. If you have a look in the lp website under downloads / movies / lp wearhouse you can see all the little bits and bobs being assembled and it might give you an better idea of what I am talking about.

pTeppic
-19th May 2003, 16:51
You could bar code personal equipment at an entire competition, or reserve it for individual fencers...

Referees could be given a portable bar code scanner and scan a code on the back pocket of the beeches to indetify the fencer on the piste and then bring up the relevant bout on their PDA.

And it could be done totally in Linux ;-)

Kian Ryan (insane and Director of invisiTEX)

kingkenny
-20th May 2003, 07:50
pTepic is crazy he seems to think technology is all plug and play he is forgotten that we don’t have a “universal adapter” yet!(advert of tv)
:grin:

Hudson
-20th May 2003, 09:18
plus we'd need a whole lot of quarters even if we did have it (same advert)