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Hamley
-14th February 2004, 16:17
Whats the difference between a French electric epee and a german, other then german is more exspensive.



Noah

devalleassoc
-15th February 2004, 04:45
German point, german wiring?? Smoother, more reliable?? All of the above?? :shrug:

Hamley
-15th February 2004, 13:13
All of the above ...i never knew there was so many peices of equipement with german in front of it.

Thanks

Noah

devalleassoc
-15th February 2004, 14:32
Originally posted by Hamley
All of the above ...i never knew there was so many peices of equipement with german in front of it.

Thanks

Noah

Oh..... and just for s**ts and giggles..... German Viscounti grips!!:grin:

Hamley
-15th February 2004, 19:12
No =p lol.


Noah

devalleassoc
-15th February 2004, 21:53
Heh! I guess we handily delt with this thread eh?:rambo:

wingnutLP
-17th February 2004, 08:37
Germans dont make any epee's they buy them from abroad and re-lable them.
I think they buy them from France and Russia. Good old German manufacturing ;) can always relly on BMWs reputation.

symon
-22nd February 2004, 21:32
Mean "CHRIST" how many other orthapedic/pistol grips can you buy? .....theres the german, italian, russian, vicounti and on the other tread on grips they mentioned a thistle grip? never heard of that 1!! and was just on BLue Gauntlets site and just found a CHINESE grip!!!!!!!!!!!! ................will the list never end?????? :shrug:

Hamley
-23rd February 2004, 01:16
We still havent answered the question I wanted lol. "Whats the differeance between french and german wired weapons, like german tips and wires".....i hope someone answered this question.



Noah

devalleassoc
-23rd February 2004, 01:58
[QUOTE]Originally posted by devalleassoc
[B]German point, german wiring. Smoother, more reliable. :sam:

neevel
-23rd February 2004, 03:06
Originally posted by Hamley
We still havent answered the question I wanted lol. "Whats the differeance between french and german wired weapons, like german tips and wires".....i hope someone answered this question.



Noah

The German points are made to tighter manufacturing tolerances, which means that their action will be smoother and more likely to light on glancing touches. Uhlmann and Allstar wires are also have two layers of varnish on them as insulation in addition to the cloth wrapping-- one layer over the cloth, and another beneath it, on the wire directly. This gives you a bit more protection against damage to the insulation causing your weapon to ground out.

The German foil point is dimensionally different from the French, so the two are not mix-and-match compatible. French foil points have the screw thread into holes in the sliding collar of the tip, while German points have the screws thread into the barrel itself and pinch the tip collar. The thinner walls of the German barrels mean that the screw-heads can't be countersunk flush with the barrel-- this leaves the screws vulnerable to getting smashed (which makes them difficult-to-impossible to remove). The thinner walls of the german barrels also means that dents are more likely to propagate to the interior and interfere with the action of the point. Uhlmann and Allstar sell a more expensive version of their foil barrels, of a different steel and heat-treat, which is somewhat less vulnerable to dents. There is also an expanding mandrel for removing dents.

While the French barrels are more durable, the collar and retaining flange of the tips are made of brass (i.e., relatively soft), and are very prone to coming un-peened. This will cause white lights to occur on beats and parries, and ultimately result in the tip dropping out of the barrel while the collar, screws and flange stay behind (this means you can't register touches, but get no white lights to indicate a problem). The Prieur foil tips also have no metal sleeve over the plastic insulation of the tip, which leaves that more vulnerable to damage.

French and German epee parts a dimensionally similar and can generally be mixed (though you won't get the same benefit from the better German tolerances).

When you armor for a U.S. national team, you can pretty well leave your French parts at home (the only call I've had for them at that level is doing pro-bono work helping the Cubans).

-Dave

YeOlde Armourer
-23rd February 2004, 11:47
I find the new epee point and barrel from SG to be superior to the german and french epee tip. And you can use either wire with it. I perfer the german myself. The SG epee tip is much tighter and smooth then ny thing I seen in 30 years.


Tim Loomis:knight: :tank: :tank2: :knight:

Hamley
-23rd February 2004, 18:57
Thanks neevel that was exsactly what i was hopeing for. I guess I should put the extra bucks in getting a german because alot of times i hit the person but it dosnt register.


Thanks again

Noah

PKT
-23rd February 2004, 20:12
Well said, neevel.

In plain English, what neevel was saying is that the thinner-walled German points, when hit, tend to get out of round. The result is that your tip gets stuck after a hit.

The premium of the German points is worth it.

PK

PKT
-23rd February 2004, 20:20
this is Barry Paul's post re forges and a bit of sales pitch [I did a bit of editing to make it more readable ;) ]:


Barry Paul
Member

Re: Who Makes My Blade?

There are about 10 firms who actually make blades by forging or rolling.
1. Blaise Freres. B.F.
2. Leon Paul L.P..
3. Viniti. Lammet L.M..
4. Metal West M.W..
5. Chevalier D'Auvergne (was France Lame before Hostine).
6. Megastar.
7. Weyersberg Kirschbaum KW.

These all have at least one type of blade approved by the F.I.E.
8-9.

In China there are two main forges and no doubt another unknown number.

I have also found forges in Argentina, Japan and other countries.

Allstar/Uhlmann
PBT
do not make blades. They buy them from one of the above forges and have their name stamped on them.

The sabre blade of the moment could be either the Lammet Blade or the Metal West.

Leon Paul are at the present redesigning a blade for the top fencers, now that the stiffness has been increased greatly some fencers want a stronger forte region. Up to now, we have concentrated on lightness. The problem of balance is partly a matter of fashion. About a year ago, there was a fashion for very heavy pommels to 'BRING THE BALANCE BACK TO THE HAND'. I did offer to make some lead- lined gloves so the fencers could do even more weight training when they fence!!!!!!!!!.

As a club blade our etoile sabre blades have a very good reputation.

Pozdniakov, the Olympic Champion, did say to me, after coming off the piste at the Olympic Championships in Atlanta having won the individual, that his Etoile electric sabre with light weight guard was good for him.

Two days later he confirmed, as he left the piste having won the team medal, it was still good for him.

If they are good for the present top-ranked sabreur they cannot be too bad.

Barry Paul

PS. In Canadian-speak, "not bad", in typical Canadian unstatement, is what the Americans would call "very good", or "excellent". - PK

neevel
-24th February 2004, 05:22
Originally posted by PKT

PS. In Canadian-speak, "not bad", in typical Canadian unstatement, is what the Americans would call "very good", or "excellent". - PK

Heh- most of my extended family are from North Dakota and Minnesota, and "not bad" means the same thing in their parlance. "Not bad at all" in the upper Midwest is an expression of almost orgiastic pleasure (as in: "So we all sat down with a case of Leinenkugels and some Neuske's sausage and watched the Packers beat the Vikings-- that was not bad at all".) :grin:.

PKT
-16th March 2004, 18:56
neevel,

it's been proven that those of us living on either side of the Canada/US border are more similar in many respects than the Americans in the north cf the Americans in the southern US of A.

pk