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Andy W.
-23rd March 2004, 15:01
I wonder if someone could put me right on how to repair a bayonet three pin body wire for foil? Wire was rejected at a long gone competiton (white light on for no apprent reason) and so I think its probaly time I found out how to do it myself.

I have a multimeter and a sufficently impressive tool kit, just lack the knowledge, so any help or directions to a good work of reference gratefully recieved.

Peter Pan
-23rd March 2004, 15:30
Click on the "Armoury" button at the top of the page; then "foil" then "bodywire"

Andy W.
-23rd March 2004, 16:03
Thanks for that, but there is no obvious break. Presumably it is possible to buy new flex/wire somewhere?

Also any hints on how to test it without buying a test box/or going down to the club?

Barry Paul
-23rd March 2004, 17:10
Or break in foil which is only appearing intermitently. Barry Paul

neevel
-23rd March 2004, 18:15
Originally posted by Andy W.
Thanks for that, but there is no obvious break. Presumably it is possible to buy new flex/wire somewhere?

Also any hints on how to test it without buying a test box/or going down to the club?

If you've got a mulitmeter, that's actually greatly preferable to an LED tester. What you want to do is test each line (A, B and C) of the cord. If the body cord is in spec, you ought to be seeing 1 ohm or less resistance in each line. If you see more than that, then something is going wrong. Now, scoring boxes need to see well over that 1 ohm limit before they start throwing white lights, so a wire can show a consistent 10-20 ohms or more and still work. Still, a high resistance like that does indicate an incipient problem (something you wouldn't notice if you just used a make/break LED tester).

Pull on and flex the wire coming out of the plugs while you have it connected to the meter to turn up any intermittent problems that might not show when the cord is at rest. It's also a good idea to test across the lines (A-B, B-C, C-A) for any shorts.

One common, but quick and simple, maintenance item with Leon Paul cords is to keep the contact screws tight. The pressure of the wire insulation on the penetrating head of the screws can cause them to start to back out a bit. Additionally, you can get grit or corrosion between the screw and the wire which will interfere with conductivity. Pull down the rubber boot, back the screws off about a quarter turn, and then re-tighten them. This will help break-up any layer of corrosion and ensure a good contact between the screw and the wire.

If the wire is badly corroded or broken near the center, you can replace it with 22-gauge speaker wire if you can't obtain any OEM wire from Leon Paul. The speaker wire won't be as fine-stranded and supple as the LP wire, though. If the A-line wire needs to be replaced or trimmed-back at the crocodile clip, remember that the rules require a soldered connection at the clip.

-Dave

Andy W.
-23rd March 2004, 19:16
I shall try it out directly! Thanks very much Dave.

Barry Paul
-24th March 2004, 07:56
Dave can I take you answer to put in our amoury section. Barry Paul

Andy W.
-25th March 2004, 17:30
Many thanks David, easy to use instructions showed that in less than 5 mins that all the wires are near perfect (1 ohmn) , even the 'allegedly' broken one. Armed with the 'knowledge' I shall embark on rewiring old shredded wire, have just got to get hold the replacement flex first. Thanks for the tip about soldering the body clip.
Makes me wonder,, is there a quick test for the wires from the boxes and the boxes themselves???
Seems to me we went through all the hastle of changing a body wire during an elimination bout for no reason!

:)

neevel
-26th March 2004, 03:09
Originally posted by Andy W.

Makes me wonder,, is there a quick test for the wires from the boxes and the boxes themselves???
Seems to me we went through all the hastle of changing a body wire during an elimination bout for no reason!

:)

Keep a couple of test leads with stackable bananna plug ends and slip-on alligator clips on hand. You'll be able to short across the appropriate reel, floor cord, and scoring box terminals to verify that they're working.

You typically want to work back from the weapon when troubleshooting a problem. For white-lights in foil, you can use a sabre (i.e., grounded) socket to eliminate the weapon and provide a known-good closure across the body cord plug.

-Dave

PS- Barry, check your PMs.