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Tom_W
-1st April 2004, 19:32
I have just ordered my first steam foil.... im dead excited :-)

any tips on care for my first weapon are gratefully received.

NHCTUSA Fencer
-1st April 2004, 19:42
never use it cold, always warm it up.

don't hit the tip on the ground.

if your going to change handles, take your time, don't rush it cause you can clip the wire.

don't throw it around, place it.


that's all i got, just show it some T.L.C. :tongue:

gladiator
-1st April 2004, 20:27
Firstly, as it's a steam foil you don't need to worry about hitting the tip on the floor (as long as you don't do it too hard) or clipping the wire when you are changing handles.

There isn't really much you need to do with a steam foil other than make sure you don't bend the blade by stepping on it by accident or anything. Try and keep it safe and out of the way of anyone who might want to play with it. The TLC is a good idea. By warming up the blade 'NHCTUSA Fencer' just means that if it has been in the cold (e.g. outside) for a while then let it adjust to the room temperature for a minute before putting it under the stress of fencing. You don't actually need to sit there and stroke it or anything before you start a bout, although it may bring you some luck ?!?!?!

Keep an eye on the condition of the rubber tip as they can become worn through and will need replacing.

Other than that, congratulations and enjoy hitting people with your new weapon!

gbm
-1st April 2004, 20:28
Originally posted by NHCTUSA Fencer
never use it cold, always warm it up.

don't hit the tip on the ground.

if your going to change handles, take your time, don't rush it cause you can clip the wire.

don't throw it around, place it.


that's all i got, just show it some T.L.C. :tongue:

You don't need to worry about clipping the wire on a steam foil (since there isn't one!), and you don't really have to worry about the tip so much (since the little rubber bit is a lot tougher than it looks and easy to replace).
You can get a blade cleaning block eventually, but if you have a Paul France with a gold colour it's better just to leave it until it starts to rust slightly, or you rub off the gold colour. Also buy a blade tube or otherwise don't let it rest on sweaty jackets!
You can always rub a little bit of oil or WD40 into it, but make sure you rub it all off afterwards (I don't bother to do this, it's not necessary).
If you've got a French leather grip, it will look rubbish when you first get it, but after a few months the gaps will close up (after leaving a horrible colour all over your glove). Also a steam foil should last longer than an electric, even a maraging.
Have fun!

dunastor
-1st April 2004, 21:25
Originally posted by gladiator
You don't actually need to sit there and stroke it or anything before you start a bout, although it may bring you some luck ?!?!?!

maybe I just shouldn't say anything at all.....

Hamley
-1st April 2004, 22:00
Whats a steam foil :(

/sigh Me=noob



Noah

Rdb811
-1st April 2004, 22:22
Steam = Non-electric.

For any blade, ensure there is only one bend in the blade and it is downwards - somebody at your club will be able to explain better than I can wirte it.

Tom_W
-6th April 2004, 13:19
Thanks folks.

It arriving on Thurs, im quivering with anticipation.

not under the misapprehension that it will make me good , just hoping it will make me suck less :)

Tom_W
-6th April 2004, 15:00
Its getting breaches that makes a fencer good ;)

gbm
-6th April 2004, 16:50
Just out of interest, what do you need to do to be allowed to put british racing stripes down your breeches and GBR on your back?

randomsabreur
-6th April 2004, 16:55
Pay the required fee to LP or other kit manufacturer!

I think tho' that for name and colours its doing an A-grade, junior or senior.

uk_45
-6th April 2004, 16:57
Nothing any one can out the go faster stripes on or have GBR on there back if you goto an A-Grade or higher or an internation comp you are expected to have the go faster stripes and required to have your Surname and GBRr on your back

gbm
-6th April 2004, 22:17
For which you would then require 800N kit...
I'm now going to keep my eye out for anybody with 350N kit and go faster stripes and GBR, as they have no real reason for having them?

devalleassoc
-13th April 2004, 02:01
Interesting. 350N kit not allowed in international comp. So, go faster stripes on 350N kit is just plain rediculous!! (Kind of like putting an M3 badge on a normal 4 door Bimmer!!):grin: Whose fooling who??

Winwaloe
-13th April 2004, 10:47
Meow! Some fencers do compete outside of the UK in non A grade comps. They may well want to put Nat colours on their kit as they may be proud to belong to that Country. Same reason many of my club have a Union Flag on their club shirts. They compete outside of the Uk and they want others to know they are British. Any problmes??

wingnutLP
-13th April 2004, 11:53
It does raise a valid point though.

Several people on this forum have commented on the number of people with their names and GB strip on at competitions.

Someone last week sent their lame in to be named

PRETENTIOUS
GBR

Which I thought was very funny!!

In all seriousness there are people who put their names and country on 350N kit and have clearly never attended an A grade. Personally I think this detracts from the ststus of the people who have represented GB.

gbm
-13th April 2004, 12:14
I see the point in international competitions. When you see somebody with 'NGR' or 'USA' on their backs, it makes sense. But when you fence in the UK, 'Hey, you fence in Great Britain. Wow, so do I, what a coincidence!'. And the number of fencers (some now quite old) with 'Welsh Youth International' on their arms...

gbm
-13th April 2004, 12:16
Of course, I could just be jealous...

Prometheus
-13th April 2004, 13:40
Originally posted by wingnut
It does raise a valid point though.

Several people on this forum have commented on the number of people with their names and GB strip on at competitions.

Someone last week sent their lame in to be named

PRETENTIOUS
GBR

Which I thought was very funny!!

In all seriousness there are people who put their names and country on 350N kit and have clearly never attended an A grade. Personally I think this detracts from the ststus of the people who have represented GB.

hmmm, I don't think so. Seeing as there will hardly be any A-grades left in this countryyou may have to change people to person :)

Anyway, you have satellite a-grades which are 'open' and from the later stages require national markings (except one I attended abroad where they disregarded this ruling).

Winwaloe
-15th April 2004, 09:54
Hope that some of you lot never go in to wine making! - I don't and never have had name/country on the back of my various lame. There are people who wander around in Olympic Games dressing gowns, Commonwealth Games track suits, trundle around wheelie bags with the names of various World Championships stamped on them but so what. These people have risen to heights that most of us/you will not and are proud of it. None of them seem at all arrogant re their achievments. Instead of making snide remarks perhaps we should recognise and congratulate them on their (past) achievments. Or to put it another way For ***** sake, get a life!!!

Insipiens
-15th April 2004, 11:03
So lets say you are going to the Leon Paul international. Obviously you will need 800N kit for this, and if you make it to the L32 you will need your name and nationality on your kit.

So do you not have name and nationality put on in the expectation you won't make it that far? (see other thread in the tournaments section).

And then you go to an open tournament and for one reason or another (washing?) you wear 350N kit.

Treat it like the number on the back of any other sport's clothing.

wingnutLP
-15th April 2004, 12:11
IMOHO 350N kit + name and country =

PRETENTIOUS
GBR

;)

randomsabreur
-15th April 2004, 15:09
And there's me desperately wishing that I possessed a lame without my name and breeches without stripes, for those days when my brain has decided that it did not want to attend the competition, although I am present in body.

Those are moments when you want to remain quietly anonymous, but even my oldest lame has my name on it, even if the wretched thing is getting to the point where the patches need patching.

Anyway, the best clue for who to be scared of is to look for weapon control marks on various bits of kit, name + stripes + hundreds of scribbles on lame means it is time to be scared. Name + stripes + shiny new shoes and guard and no scribbles means PRETENTIOUS GBR or someone's bag either didn't make it off the 'plane, or got nicked!

uk_45
-15th April 2004, 15:14
in sabre it's so nice so get some one with a nice shinny guard as even if you lose you can mark it nicely!

Neo
-16th April 2004, 15:17
I been talking about this recently. I want to go the Cole Cup, but the chances are I won't make it into L32 (although see Barry Flood's other post about being required whether its poules/DE/whatever for all Coupe du Nord Satellite events). The problem is, I do see it as rather pretentious and when I get back to club will feel like a right tit with naming and stripes (pity they're not removable)

:S

imported_sword_fixer
-18th April 2004, 14:20
I believe that the only correct way of having go-faster stripes on your kit is that you have earned them by being selected for your country at UK International level.

However I think anyone can buy them.

But ....if your not one of the top 12 Junior, Senior or Cadets then people are going to think it a bit sus when you show up in your shiny new kit and then can't land a hit.

It is a requirement that you have your name and country on your back when competing in an "A" grade.

Apparantly the President of the BFA has been known to have a quiet word with some fencers that wear UK colours without deserving them.

But at the end of the day its up to you if you want to ponce around in something you can't live up to.

gbm
-18th April 2004, 14:32
I think you need go-faster stripes for any competition for which you need to have your name on your back for, so depending on which competitions you are planning to go to you may be required to buy them.
There are competitions for which anybody can enter, but 800N kit, name and racing stripes are required for all stages aren't there? It would be a bit impractical to take the racing stripes off for most competitions, then sew them back on again e.t.c.

For instance, am I denied from going abroad or to high level competitions just because I am rubbish? I don't see a problem with stripes on 800N kit if you need it or have ever needed it (or will hopefully ever need it...).

Not that I'm planning too, by the way.

Neo
-18th April 2004, 14:37
you need them for A-Grades including satellites - both naming *and* strips

gbm
-18th April 2004, 14:44
Do you have to qualify for them?

Neo
-18th April 2004, 14:49
I'm not sure about for all of them (think full A-Grades are restricted) but I know at least some satellite events are open

uk_45
-18th April 2004, 15:20
A-Grades are by selection.

gbm
-18th April 2004, 15:30
Including the satellites?

Demonic
-18th April 2004, 15:30
I must admit when i started out fencing bout 12+ years ago i didnt see many people at opens with GBR on their back and now in the last 2 years ive been back on the scene i see loads of people with GBR on backs which some times i wonder did they ever fence for GBR.At present i still have my own GBR patch sitting at home which i earned when i was in the juniors however until i feel ive earned it by representing GBR it will stay at home.
Alot of the time the go faster stripes and GBR just seems as if its a mind game to try and frighten opponents which i have noticed works alot of the time but from what i was taught by my first coach John Llewelyn is forget what they look like at the end of the day everyone can be beaten if you can work out how...

Neo
-18th April 2004, 15:47
Originally posted by goodbadandme
Including the satellites?

no, all the satellites I know of are open.

Neo
-18th April 2004, 15:50
Originally posted by Demonic
I must admit when i started out fencing bout 12+ years ago i didnt see many people at opens with GBR on their back and now in the last 2 years ive been back on the scene i see loads of people with GBR on backs which some times i wonder did they ever fence for GBR.At present i still have my own GBR patch sitting at home which i earned when i was in the juniors however until i feel ive earned it by representing GBR it will stay at home.
Alot of the time the go faster stripes and GBR just seems as if its a mind game to try and frighten opponents which i have noticed works alot of the time but from what i was taught by my first coach John Llewelyn is forget what they look like at the end of the day everyone can be beaten if you can work out how...

ok someone needs to clarify - as far as I know, British stripes no longer mean that you were part of the British Team and are necessary alongside naming at A-grades/satellites and upwards. Is this correct? Cos there's a lot of people talking about "representing GBR" which reads as if they're still talking about being part of the British team. If this is indeed correct and the above assertion is correct (which from what I've heard it is) then said people need to get up to date.

gbm
-18th April 2004, 15:53
Technically I represented Wales at the British Youth U18 Boys Foil one year.
I qualified by default, since three people in my category turned up, and I came third. I was the only one to go to Stoke-on-Trent though.
I came last but one.
But at least I represented Wales...

uk_45
-18th April 2004, 15:55
That means you can where the welsh patch on your jacket or breeches for sabreurs

Neo
-18th April 2004, 16:08
actually what's the regs on putting scottish or welsh colours on things? I wanted to put a nice scottish flag somewhere :)

gbm
-18th April 2004, 16:09
Originally posted by uk_45
That means you can where the welsh patch on your jacket or breeches for sabreurs

I'd feel a bit silly doing that though. Especially since I had also qualified the year before without actually winning a match (I lost them all!).

Neo
-18th April 2004, 16:16
Originally posted by goodbadandme
Technically I represented Wales at the British Youth U18 Boys Foil one year.
I qualified by default, since three people in my category turned up, and I came third. I was the only one to go to Stoke-on-Trent though.
I came last but one.
But at least I represented Wales...


They should have offered free sheep for use for the winners that would have gotten more of em along :grin: :grin: :grin:

uk_45
-18th April 2004, 16:24
No i like the idea of your weight in jaffa cakes!

Neo
-18th April 2004, 16:27
that could get expensive given that everytime u eat em, you'd then get more the next time :P

uk_45
-18th April 2004, 16:32
But nice!

Demonic
-18th April 2004, 16:42
i gained my GBR when i was in the cadets and juniors for being part of the british squad in 'A' grades abroad.I made the british cadet team but as a non travel reserve as i was 4th in the rankings but that doesnt really count at all :tongue:

imported_sword_fixer
-19th April 2004, 08:44
The FIE insist that fencers attending an FIE standard competition (ie "A" grade and above)state that....

All fencers "must display their name and nationality, in dark blue capital letters on the back of their jacket. The letters must be between 10cm maximum and 8cm minimum"

Material rules, Apendix,Chapter IV specific regulations A.Marks,Fencing clothing and equipment.

There is no requirement for national colours or stripes.

The wearing of the go-faster stripe should be solely for fencers that have been selected to represent their country by the BFA

:sam:

randomsabreur
-19th April 2004, 09:02
At Coupe du Nords (sabre satellites) GB stripes are required! These are open so anyone who wishes to shell out for an FIE licence and go on a nice holiday interupted by a bit of fencing in somewhere like reykjavic can do them.

Leaving obtaining stripes and name to the last minute can be a pain in the derriere, having had to go to pauls to get a jacket named in the first week of Jan, and having had to sit and sew on stripes for breeches at the airport while waiting to check in, and once through the baggage claim at the other end while waiting for the bus, and for most of the evening before the competition. And I'm only a sabreur so I didn't have to worry about doing my arms!!!!!!!

If you think you are above 90% certain to do an FIE sattelite or A-Grade in a season, my advice would be to get all necessary kit sorted out as early as possible and save on last minute sewing marathons!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Neo
-19th April 2004, 09:57
Originally posted by sword_fixer
The FIE insist that fencers attending an FIE standard competition (ie "A" grade and above)state that....

All fencers "must display their name and nationality, in dark blue capital letters on the back of their jacket. The letters must be between 10cm maximum and 8cm minimum"

Material rules, Apendix,Chapter IV specific regulations A.Marks,Fencing clothing and equipment.

There is no requirement for national colours or stripes.

The wearing of the go-faster stripe should be solely for fencers that have been selected to represent their country by the BFA

:sam:

That may or may not be so, but when the entry form specifically says naming AND stripes are required, I ain't gonna risk getting a red card per match by arguing with em :P

Neo
-19th April 2004, 10:02
Originally posted by randomsabreur
At Coupe du Nords (sabre satellites) GB stripes are required! These are open so anyone who wishes to shell out for an FIE licence and go on a nice holiday interupted by a bit of fencing in somewhere like reykjavic can do them.

Leaving obtaining stripes and name to the last minute can be a pain in the derriere, having had to go to pauls to get a jacket named in the first week of Jan, and having had to sit and sew on stripes for breeches at the airport while waiting to check in, and once through the baggage claim at the other end while waiting for the bus, and for most of the evening before the competition. And I'm only a sabreur so I didn't have to worry about doing my arms!!!!!!!

If you think you are above 90% certain to do an FIE sattelite or A-Grade in a season, my advice would be to get all necessary kit sorted out as early as possible and save on last minute sewing marathons!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I suspect this is the same for all competitions A-Grade/Satellite and above, which perhaps answers the underlying question by default

Neo
-19th April 2004, 10:09
I notice from FIE Rules...


Placing the point of the weapon on the piste at any time to straighten it is forbidden

Why? Also, see this regularly :P

gladiator
-19th April 2004, 10:32
The main reason for this is that it can damage the metallic piste. This is clearly not enforced on a normal piste, only on metallics. And it does get given, but the fencers who are likely to be fencing on a metallic piste with a good knowledgable ref will generally all be aware of this and if not they will find out quickly!

srb
-19th April 2004, 10:37
Its a general statement to cover electric pistes. If you straighten a weapon on an electric piste, you will damage it.

The assumption in the FIE rules is probably that electric pistes are always used. As no distinction is made, techincally straightening your weapon on any piste is an offence. However, it would only be a very pedantic president that gives someone a yellow card for this when there is no electric piste (though I have seen it done).

As good practice I would recommend always straightening your weapon off the piste, as it means you won't forget and do it when you are on an electric piste by accident.

srb (beaten to it by gladiator)

imported_sword_fixer
-19th April 2004, 11:02
That may or may not be so, but when the entry form specifically says naming AND stripes are required, I ain't gonna risk getting a red card per match by arguing with em :P

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I suspect that the competition organisers in this case may be at fault, but

the DT is never wrong even when he is so your attitude is correct:confused:

Neo
-19th April 2004, 11:18
Originally posted by srb
Its a general statement to cover electric pistes. If you straighten a weapon on an electric piste, you will damage it.

The assumption in the FIE rules is probably that electric pistes are always used. As no distinction is made, techincally straightening your weapon on any piste is an offence. However, it would only be a very pedantic president that gives someone a yellow card for this when there is no electric piste (though I have seen it done).

As good practice I would recommend always straightening your weapon off the piste, as it means you won't forget and do it when you are on an electric piste by accident.

So if you step off the side off a piste (during a match, but not while fencing) that's ok?

Neo
-19th April 2004, 11:18
Originally posted by sword_fixer
That may or may not be so, but when the entry form specifically says naming AND stripes are required, I ain't gonna risk getting a red card per match by arguing with em :P

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I suspect that the competition organisers in this case may be at fault, but

the DT is never wrong even when he is so your attitude is correct:confused:

every A-Grade organiser? Hmm, not likely :P

gladiator
-19th April 2004, 11:28
Originally posted by Neo
So if you step off the side off a piste (during a match, but not while fencing) that's ok?

It's ok to go off when not fencing for a reason such as straightening weapon, tightening the grip, changing weapons etc.. This must be during a break in fencing though. So Yes!

srb
-19th April 2004, 12:36
Originally posted by gladiator
It's ok to go off when not fencing for a reason such as straightening weapon, tightening the grip, changing weapons etc.. This must be during a break in fencing though. So Yes!

You should still ask permission from the president before doing it.

srb

imported_sword_fixer
-19th April 2004, 13:26
Neo,
It's not every "A" grade that insists on stripes.

Australian
-19th April 2004, 14:44
Originally posted by sword_fixer
Neo,
It's not every "A" grade that insists on stripes.

from the last 64 in any senior A grade you must have the national colours (in GBR's case, stripes, in my case, green and gold stars)

the penalty for not having this is a red card every time you present yourself on the piste for a fight but you do not have to change clothing

Australian
-19th April 2004, 14:47
Originally posted by srb
The assumption in the FIE rules is probably that electric pistes are always used.

thats it: in fact the FIE don't recognise that competitions are held without metallic pistes, and thus don't write rules for them

its the same with 9 match team events, and another thing i can't remember *sigh*

uk_45
-19th April 2004, 15:01
Ok why dont they recognise them i mean they must know we arn't all rolling in money!

Australian
-19th April 2004, 15:06
Originally posted by uk_45
Ok why dont they recognise them i mean they must know we arn't all rolling in money!

3CT or Keith or ihunter will be able to answer this better than me, but the reality is that they don't need to. Its up to the individual organisers to control it

uk_45
-19th April 2004, 15:10
I Spose they only really care about big comps A-Grades and the likes dont they.

Rdb811
-19th April 2004, 17:00
We've had this before - testing your tip (on or off piste) could be a means of loosening it (hence the regulation - as somebody else pointed out, it's only partially about protecting the piste).

uk_45
-19th April 2004, 17:28
So how about sabre?

gbm
-19th April 2004, 17:51
Why do sabreurs need a metallic piste?

Steve
-23rd April 2004, 15:43
They don't! But does that mean that the FIE don't recognise sabre competitions that are held without metallic pistes?

uk_45
-23rd April 2004, 15:48
Course they dont!