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View Full Version : individual lessons - warm up/down



DrT
-14th May 2004, 10:47
It seems each coach has their own routines for starting and ending individual lessons. I'd be really interested to hear about the way you, or your coach, get the lesson up to speed, then wind down at the end.

Rdb811
-16th May 2004, 15:32
I don't think I've ever had a lesson that wound down - most start with a couple of simple hits to arm (to get the fencer into traing mode rather than club speed, then then first bit of the action, then keep adding actions.

doobarz
-16th May 2004, 20:03
My sabre lessons from all coaches have ended with lunge hits with the point.

nirvana
-16th May 2004, 20:34
my coach gets me mentally warmed up by doing some simople hits then with disengage, then step hit, step disengage and going back doing some parry repostes liek cart sixte and the last one with a disengage on the end. He wamrs me down by just doin some lunges bout 3 or 4.

randomsabreur
-17th May 2004, 10:01
Most of my lessons start with hits and then counter ripostes, and when the coaches change it, I get pretty confused.

I share a couple of coaches with Doobarz, and finishing with point stuff, (PIL or Lunge to hit with the point).

I think they do it so that you stay on the lunge and are balanced and they can check the position, although I have to admit that the arrival of the point work can be a relief. Very nice to have a signal that I can go and lie down soon!

Shaolin Monkey
-7th June 2004, 11:32
Originally posted by doobarz
My sabre lessons from all coaches have ended with lunge hits with the point.
Mine too, except that after twenty minutes it becomes difficult to go point in line

DrT
-7th June 2004, 14:20
I know what you mean about finding simple actions quite difficult at the end of a lesson. I've only recently started giving individual lessons and there have been occasions when I've worked the fencer a little too hard. They are too tired at the end to finish on "high note" with some well done, simple actions. It's a difficult thing to balance. I suppose I just need to learn to spot the signs of tiredness a little sooner :o:

Of course, you could just work the lazy oiks 'till they drop and they can warm down by crawling back the side of the hall ;)

clockity
-7th June 2004, 14:32
Originally posted by DrT
I know what you mean about finding simple actions quite difficult at the end of a lesson. I've only recently started giving individual lessons and there have been occasions when I've worked the fencer a little too hard. They are too tired at the end to finish on "high note" with some well done, simple actions. It's a difficult thing to balance. I suppose I just need to learn to spot the signs of tiredness a little sooner :o:

Of course, you could just work the lazy oiks 'till they drop and they can warm down by crawling back the side of the hall ;)
Oi! :eek:

"You only think you're tired."

Shaolin Monkey
-7th June 2004, 14:34
Im sure that after a few weeks doing lessons it gets easier, the quality of sabre coaching when I go home for the holidays is of a decent standard. Next years task is to get down to lazslo's once or twice a week.

fencingmaster
-10th June 2004, 09:24
Academy News (may 2004) has just published my article on warm-up lessons to prepare the fencer both physically and psychologically.

DrT
-14th June 2004, 15:10
I've had a read of the article and it sets out some nice ideas on getting a fencer "going." Worth a read for everyone if you can get hold of a copy. :)

Do you always use a similar (I don't mean identical) warm-up with a given fencer? Do you find that the familiar preparation helps settle them into the right frame of mind?

Also, how do you change it if you are preparing them for a fight, rather than a lesson?

Aoife
-19th June 2004, 12:52
:upset: I don't even get individual lessons :sniffle:


Do most coaches really give individual lessons? I've had one or two at the Bromley workshops, but never at my club... I mean I bout with my coach, but I bout with everyone.

Rdb811
-19th June 2004, 13:04
All coaches only ever give individual lessons, except to beginners.

(I know they are trained to give group lessons at higher levels, but I've never seen it done).

Dave Hillier
-19th June 2004, 13:39
Aoife, there is a difference between coaching fencing and teaching it.

Teaching strokes and combinations of moves can be done in a class environment. However getting the timing and fine detail right needs to be done on an individual basis.

It sounds like your coach is teaching rather than coaching. Not that there is anything wrong with that but it can only take you so far.

gbm
-19th June 2004, 22:31
The same probably applies to me then...

Aoife
-25th June 2004, 19:42
Aye, probably right. Not like he's a qualified coach or nowt, so I guess it's more natural for him (being a school teacher) to teach class-like lessons.

The whole 'one-on-one' thing is usually what I do with beginners, whilst the rest f the class does mroe advanced stuff... not 'coaching' so much as showing them the ropes.