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gbm
-1st June 2004, 20:37
I recently bought a pair of Viktoria size 8 Complow shoes, and I haven't really worn them in yet. But I read I while ago a recommendation for Sorbothane Double Strike insoles, so I bought a pair of those. The (possible) trouble is that the Viktorias don't really have insoles as such. They have a rock-solid rubber base, and inside the shoe is a very flimsy and very thin foam insole. So replacing this with the fairly thick double strike insole means that my toes are now tighter against the top of the shoe. But I'm wearing them now, and it doesn't seem to be too much of a problem...
Does anybody else have any experiences with retro-fitting shoes with insoles?

Boo Boo
-1st June 2004, 21:49
I have the sorbothane full strike (they are like the double strike, but thicker) insoles in my addidas equipment boots. They sit on top of the boots own insoles. Did make things a bit tight, but just adjusted the laces until things fitted better...

Have worn through my full stikes and have a new pair awaiting collection from the sports shoe shop - so thank goodness that I didn't take the old insoles out (otherwise I would be through to the floor...!)

ChubbyHubby uses the sorbothane double strikes - again he wears them on top of his fencing shoe insoles...

My personal recommendation is to ensure that you cut the sorbothane insoles to size and that you cross-lace your laces (seems to make tyhe shoes fit better).

Boo
(wouldn't be without her sorbothane insoles...)

gbm
-1st June 2004, 22:34
As I said, the Viktorias have effectively no insole... if you take out the little bit of foam (about 2mm thick polystyrene foam) then you just have the rubber sole of the shoe, which is solid.

When you say crosslace them, I assume you mean cross both strings over at every hole. One of my pet hates is when you buy trainers and THE'VE ONLY BOTHERED TO PUT ONE-HALF OF THE LACE THROUGH THE HOLES! :mad: So one lace just goes straight from the top to the bottom. I just have to relace any trainers I buy.

The Full Strike's are designed to fit under existing insoles apparently, but the single and double strikes are insoles, and they really are quite thick (~4-6mm? more at the heel).

I have already hacked away at them a bit with a pair of scissors.

Does the sorbothane really make that much of a difference?

Boo Boo
-1st June 2004, 23:00
Yes, I understood what you meant - what I mean is that I wouldn't take anything out - thin, foamy insole or not...

By cross-lace I mean that you cross that each lace will go in a hole on each row of holes. Each lace will alternate which side of the shoe it laces through - so they cross in the middle between each row of holes. Why do I feel my explanation confuses things rather than makes them clearer... :(

Yes, sorry - my confusion... I have the thick ones (double strike), ChubbyHubby has the thin ones (full strike). I know what they look like, but got confused about what they are called... :(

I bought them, originally (about three years ago) because I bruised my right/front heel whilst doing footwork in a sports hall with a concrete floor. The sorbothane helped allow my heel to heal, and I have worn them ever since. ChubbyHubby had similar problems and got a pair to sort his bruised heel out too. I believe that srb may use them too (definitely remember talking to him about them...).

I probably wear through a pair every 9 to 12 months (similar life to fencing shoes for me...).

Am pretty sure that they make a difference - wouldn't want to go back to not using them...

Boo

Rdb811
-1st June 2004, 23:51
The full length sorbothane liners (the full strike) don't have a built up insole wheeras the two shorter lengths (double stike etc) do - which would make them harder to fit in the shoes and unsuited to what I was looking for.

I have size 10 feet, which don't correspond to a Paris size (I was looking atthe back of the box my Adidas Hi boots came in - the 'continental' sizes are decided irregular) - I have larger boots and have always had an extra insole, which makes them really comfy and a perfect fit. I swapped over to Full Strike insoles a while ago and found them well worth the money - good for the poor old joints and well worth the dough

I'd better check I haven't worn them flat, ut they still seem good to me..

KayJay
-2nd June 2004, 06:34
Just been checking these insoles out. They don't seem to live up to their name, since the pack clearly says "Shock Stoppers" - didn't work when I saw the price! Okay, so I'm a cheapskate but the price tag is the same as for the Hi-Tec squash shoes I use.....are they REALLY worth the dough?

Naughty foilist
-2nd June 2004, 07:46
Sorbothane seem to have three different insoles, full strike, double strike and another really thin one that fits ever so nicely into D'Artanians.

Got a pair for Flatline in a specialist running shop in the City one lunch time. His little squashy heel pads for 'Policeman's foot', (tennis elbow for the feet), were too big to cushion the impact of a lunge but apparently these 'thin' ones do the trick without squishing his toes.

Sorry I can't remember the name but they weren't much thicker than an After Eight mint.

gbm
-2nd June 2004, 08:15
Originally posted by Boo Boo
Yes, I understood what you meant - what I mean is that I wouldn't take anything out - thin, foamy insole or not...

By cross-lace I mean that you cross that each lace will go in a hole on each row of holes. Each lace will alternate which side of the shoe it laces through - so they cross in the middle between each row of holes. Why do I feel my explanation confuses things rather than makes them clearer... :(


Thanks, I cross-lace obsessively (hate it done any other way). I would leave the other insole in except I'm not sure my foot would fit with both insoles! Viktoria's aren't exactly roomy, at least they aren't after you put a great big insole in them...

Rdb811
-2nd June 2004, 09:39
Originally posted by KayJay
Just been checking these insoles out. They don't seem to live up to their name, since the pack clearly says "Shock Stoppers" - didn't work when I saw the price! Okay, so I'm a cheapskate but the price tag is the same as for the Hi-Tec squash shoes I use.....are they REALLY worth the dough?

I thought they were, over a period of time.

SarahRhiannon
-2nd June 2004, 09:41
Can't say i have tried either but in relation to your toes being against the end of your runners - i have some fairly snug fencing shoes and after a days of training noticed that my big toe nail seemed to have blood under it. decided to ignore it for about 2 months until the whole nail turned purple and then had to get a doctor to stick a needle into my toe nail. i now (over 4 months since the beginning of this story) have a small hole in my toe nail, and it may still fall off. i think it may be someting to so with the fact that the socks is was wearing were a tiny bit too big and in conjunction with the shoes caused that very unpleasant experience. (sorry i know that has not a whole lot to do with the thread..)

Gav
-2nd June 2004, 10:55
I hate wearing insoles in my fencing shoes. The insoles always seem to 'bunch up'. Do these [really expensive] ones do that? Does anyone have any tips for stopping this from happening? I tend to get sore feet after fencing for an extended period of time and anything to alleiviate that would be great.

Rdb811
-2nd June 2004, 10:58
The sorbothne ones don't, and either did the cheap Woolie's ones - I think the knack is ensuring a good fit.

It could be my low arch profile.

rory
-2nd June 2004, 11:33
I used to get a sharp pain in my hell when I lunged. Rather than speding 15+ on insoles I spent 2 on an Allstar plastic heel cup.
Surprisingly comfy and I've never had a problem since.

Rdb811
-2nd June 2004, 11:57
I'll admit I only spent the money because of my knees. I ws also working along the lines that if Run and Become stocked it, then it should be prettt good.

gbm
-2nd June 2004, 12:07
Originally posted by Gav
I hate wearing insoles in my fencing shoes. The insoles always seem to 'bunch up'. Do these [really expensive] ones do that? Does anyone have any tips for stopping this from happening? I tend to get sore feet after fencing for an extended period of time and anything to alleiviate that would be great.

You've said before you've used Viktoria's. Would these comments relate to Viktoria's? The insole they come with is really flimsy, so I could understand them moving around. But there is no padding in Viktoria's either, and the few times I have tried mine I got sore feet from hitting the floor hard. If this was the case, then these sorbothane insoles, which are specifically designed to dissapate shock but much better than a traditional insole, might very well work...

I ought to try them with and without. But if you have fat feet and Viktorias, I can't see you squeezing your insoles and your feet into them. I don't really know how fat my feet are for comparison, but it's a tight fit and I'm pretty skinny...
You might want to try one of the cheaper, thinner types, like the Prosoles.
http://www.return2fitness.co.uk/Foot_Care/Insoles_&_Footbeds/

nirvana
-2nd June 2004, 18:48
Originally posted by rory
I used to get a sharp pain in my hell when I lunged. Rather than speding 15+ on insoles I spent 2 on an Allstar plastic heel cup.
Surprisingly comfy and I've never had a problem since.

Yep, I did the same as Rory.

gbm
-2nd June 2004, 22:12
I have now tried the insoles and I think it's a great improvement. I don't get any shocks now in my feet.

Rdb811
-2nd June 2004, 23:35
The insoles have a rubber bottom surface that provides plenty of grip with the shoes to prevent 'buching up'.

jayson
-18th September 2013, 11:35
Hey i just starte fencing and this was the only fencing/insoles related thing i could find, so do these shock absorbing insoles work or should i get some custom ones ? any thoughts thanks!

hokers
-18th September 2013, 17:56
As always, I endorse the heat moulded ones, made a big difference to my shin splints.

jayson
-19th September 2013, 09:01
How do heat insoles work? Would heat insoles be better say for instance to some of these insoles from this place? ("http://nuovahealth.co.uk/?product=sports-insoles-2), I guess sports insoles would be cheaper to buy. Im not really a expert of any of these and just started fencing myself... but in the couple of weeks doing fencing iv got bad foot cramp though:(:confused:

hokers
-19th September 2013, 10:30
It's a gel that reforms when it's hot. You put them in the oven, then get them out while still hot and stand in them in the shoe. Makes for a support customised to the shape of your foot, which is good for minimising movement in the shoe as well as absorbing shock etc.

Quite expensive things, but good.

http://www.leonpaul.com/cgi-bin/sh000003.pl?REFPAGE=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.leonpaul.com% 2Facatalog%2Findex.html&WD=footbeds&SHOP=%20&PN=Heat_Moldable_Insoles.html%23aD130