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Marcos
-1st March 2005, 16:39
In the middle of our season here, with comps pretty much back to back.

The fencers in the club that I help coach in are working really hard at the moment, and gaining some excellent results locally.

Want to keep things fresh - are there any fencing related games you can think off that you can do for 15mins at the start of training?

e.g
I remember at school when Harps was coach he got us to play a kind of fencing paint-balling, where attackers would fence defenders arranged in a circle around a flag...attackers would have infinite lives but if a defender received a valid hit they left the game...basically you timed how long it took for the attackers to get to the flag...

D'Artignan
-1st March 2005, 16:52
We used to play pirates in my youth, many moons ago...:(
Basically, you divide them up into two teams and put one of the teams on one side of a marked piste, and the other team opposite. Fencers could hit anyone on the other team they like, but if they got hit they're out. The only rule was the back foot couldn't cross the side of the piste. Last team standing wins!
Great fun

Aidyboy
-3rd March 2005, 17:36
all sorts of balloon related games. Last christmas my club had a party and we all had a great time, my personal favourite was fencing sabre with a balloon in your sword hand. If your balloon is popped your out. All different types of variation on that game.;)

Aoife
-3rd March 2005, 22:14
Depending on the age (this one may not be suitable for over 12s :) ) fencing stuck in the mud is fun. First round (easy) when you get stuck you have to go en guarde; second round (hard) when you get stuck you have to go into lunge (and hold it until freed). To spice it up, those who are not in proper en guarde or lunge get some kind of punishement (laps round gym, repeted lunges et cetera).


There's another game (again for younger kids) which I saw Jamie Miller playing with his kids at the Canterbruy training course.

Put a mask in the middle of the room with a glove on it. Dive into two equally sized teams (one judge). Place teams on either side of room (say, behind a line). Get them to number themselves; without telling the judge.

Judge calls out a number, and the team member represented by that number from each team runs forward towards the glove.

(This is where it gets complicated)
The team members have to try to grab the glove and run back to their side to get a point. The person running back with the glove can be 'tagged' by the other person, and their side then gets the point. Neither person can tag until the glove has been picked up by one of the people.

This teaches (I hope) tactics. If you think you can run faster than your opponant- grab for the glove. If you think you have quick reactions and can go for a quick tag wait for them to go for the glove. It helps them learn about and devlope reactions and how to consider an opponants strengths and weaknesses against their own.

Lemonzest
-9th March 2005, 21:55
play killer, it is exctly what it says, two teams, one sports hall, all on all, last man standing wins, fantastic.

Farrago
-10th March 2005, 08:17
Originally posted by Lemonzest
play killer, it is exctly what it says, two teams, one sports hall, all on all, last man standing wins, fantastic.

We play the same but call it melee. Or have two teams and the last person standing, their team wins.

Aoife
-19th March 2005, 12:23
^ Sounds suspicously like my younger brother's idea of a good gig :grin:

purple
-21st March 2005, 18:52
Ones I use include:

* Dodgeball
* Cat and Mouse (pm for details - fox and hound is no longer PC).
* Mask and Glove (as aofie)
* Relay races (n teams, step forwards all the way to cone, lunge recover, step back/run back, etc).
* Coach says (like Simon says)
* Half/Double/Front/Back (every command is double, halved, and revsersed. So one step forward becomes two steps back. Two steps back becomes one step forward).
* Fencing cricket - Use a softball and gently throw at opponent. Oponent has to hit the ball back with the blade. Very usable for all three, just takes practice.
* Fencing slaps - Stand en-guarde, hands just touching. One side leads. Leading side lunges or fients. If partner moves on a fient, loses point. If they get hit, lose point. If they take two steps back and distance parry, they get point).

Many others. I used help with my local scout troop when I was younger and still have a few books of games knocking around. Adapting them is surprisingly easy.

Sw0rdf15h
-9th May 2005, 09:06
Games that we play at fencing to improve technique and speed etc are:
'drop the glove' - divide fencers into pairs, one glove per pair. One partner holds the glove at head height and the other partner has to lunge ( from normal lunging distance ) to grab the glove as it falls. It improves speed, and allows fencers to anticipate an action.
'the french wars' - two teams with equal numbers. The teams order themselves any way they wish, and the two teams put forward a fencer to fence first. They fence in a limited space to improve parry distance and close distance attacks/parrys etc. After the first bout, whoever wins stays on to face the next person in the other team, and they continue to fence until they are 'dead' when the next person on their team comes up to fence.
'trapped' - a box is outlined on the floor, maybe with cones at the corners, or indicating piste lines to be the box 'walls'. One team is inside the box, one team outside, and fencers cannot step outside or inside the box, depending on what team they're on.
We also play games like simon says, dodgeball and soccer.

Mr. Shrubbery
-17th May 2005, 00:26
Akos Moldovanyi used to play a game where he'd have up to about a dozen of us standing around him in a circle. He would throw a ball at you and you have to return it at the same time as he throws a second ball at you. If he throws under-arm, you throw over-arm, and vice versa. He would do all sorts of feints to make you return the ball too soon or in the wrong "line", or hold onto it for too long etc. I sometimes do this in a couple of the clubs where I coach, and it, generally, goes down well.

Another game, which, I think, I originally got from Wojciechowski's book, is a kick-around with two footballs (the idea being to keep both balls on the go for as long as possible). I used to do this a pre-match warm-up with my university team. It gets the blood going, and it's a hell of a lot more fun than running around the gym or hopping up and down the piste.

There's a good variation of tag that Adam Blight sometimes plays with his lot. Everybody, bar two people, stands in a circle. Of the remaiming two people, one is "it". He is only allowed to tag the one other person outside the circle. That person can get to safety by standing in front of one of the people in the circle. The person he is stood in front of then has to leave the circle. A really fun game, provided you can keep everyone's attention for long enough to explain the rules.

John Rohde
-17th May 2005, 00:49
I tend to use fencing. I've only ever injured myself in fencing doing circuits or playing games; I hate them :-(
I turn up to fence and I assume that my pupils do likewise.
It requires a bit of patience while they learn the rudimentary skills but from then on, I reckon that they learn fencing skills fencing. The more time they spend with a sword in their hand the better.

fencingmaster
-17th May 2005, 09:15
purple wrote "* Coach says (like Simon says)"
a variation of this I picked up from a french coach...

when someone is 'out ' instead of sitting out they form a second line and continue with the game, the point being that everyone continues to practise for the whole game; the second line can be at the rear of the original, or, as I prefer they cross the room and continue alongside the coach - the last to change line is the winner.

a variation of 'french wars' as described by 'swordfish' is 'pirates & peasants'.... as by swordfish except that each team has a line (one represents the shore and one the village) centrally placed is a treasure (usually a box of sweets) - for each win the 'treasure' is moved two metres towards the appropriate line - the winning team is the one that gets the treasure past their line [evil coach can selected a balanced team/matches and ensure that s/he never has to give up 'treasure' a ola Garry Linneker!]

John Rohde
-17th May 2005, 12:03
I admit, I remember liking the fencing games in my dim and distant beginnings - rapidly retracting half of my, "Bah Humbug!" post :-)
OTOH I would not advise football games as a warm-up for adult males: They get very excited and pull or tear muscles. You might be able to guess how I know that :-(

Mr. Shrubbery
-17th May 2005, 19:13
Originally posted by John Rohde
OTOH I would not advise football games as a warm-up for adult males: They get very excited and pull or tear muscles. You might be able to guess how I know that :-(

LOL :grin:

It ain't half as bad as adult males playing tag, especially before a female audience. :)

My first coach used to get us to play British Bulldog. That had pretty high injury potential. Don't think many fencing coaches would brave it these days. Good fun though.

Nick
-17th May 2005, 20:53
Football using a tennis ball with two small benches as the goals it gets the heart rate going and is fencing related. It also is slightly familiar so I've found this to be good with begginers.

What I call clear the net (Mighty Ducks 2) Options of either a mass of tennis balls or 4 volleyballs per team. bench across the middle the balls at the back end of the salle. everyone starts with a foot on the bench. when the coach signals you try to get rid of all the balls in your half before your opponent can. you can keep this going for a good long while and at the end of it everyone will have got going. There are also tactics involved but I'll let you work those out. Advanced warning I tried this with a school class at a very rough school which only had tennis balls. learn from my mistake and say from the beggining "if you hit someone on the other team you do ten starjumps (crouch touch toes jump) push ups, situps etc..." Once they realise you mean it they start to focus more and I've found this to be a very good excercise for getting them ready to work on more specific fencing subjects

Various forms of tag are all out there and you can play around with making them relevant to fencing or not.

John Rohde
-19th May 2005, 14:13
Originally posted by Nick
Football using a tennis ball with two small benches as the goals it gets the heart rate going and is fencing related. It also is slightly familiar so I've found this to be good with begginers.


Hi Nick! With beginners under a certain age, I'm sure it's fine. Just don't allow fencing-fit but otherwise unfit forty-somethings to join in. I did it in a place we both know well and I was walking with a stick for a couple of weeks and hobbled through the club sabre finals - in the end Isaac won it
%-(

purple
-14th June 2005, 15:06
Originally posted by John Rohde
I tend to use fencing. I've only ever injured myself in fencing doing circuits or playing games; I hate them :-(
I turn up to fence and I assume that my pupils do likewise.
It requires a bit of patience while they learn the rudimentary skills but from then on, I reckon that they learn fencing skills fencing. The more time they spend with a sword in their hand the better.

How do your young fencers warm up? I assime they don't just turn up and put a jacket on and start, or they jump straight into warm-up. Warming-up is a vital part of muscle, hear and physcological preperation.

Marcos
-14th June 2005, 15:34
skipping is good - i used to help now and again at kids comps at Salle Duffy and the kids all loved it

get a massive skipping rope and as well as being fun helps kids co-ordination


At UCD I tried a combination of S3wordfishs's glove & french war game...great fun:

fencers divided into two teams with each fencer numbered and the teams about 10 paces apart.

holding a glove in an outstreched hand you call a number, and a fencer from each team, doing footwork and lunging to get the glove.

On grabbing the glove, they keep the arm outstretched and retreat to their team. The opponent has to chase trying to snatch the glove off them....if they do they retreat ot their line, arm outstretched, etc.


as the game progresses you call the numbers in pairs. pandemonium, but good fun.

John Rohde
-14th June 2005, 15:51
Originally posted by purple
How do your young fencers warm up? I assime they don't just turn up and put a jacket on and start, or they jump straight into warm-up. Warming-up is a vital part of muscle, hear and physcological preperation.

Our fencers are in their twenties in the main. They do stretching and warm-up exercises - and games if Isaac takes the class.
I don't do the games - I try to help them enjoy fencing actions as such - and I do the warm-up out of a nagging fear that I might be a mutant: I've only ever injured myself warmimg-up under the command of others. Best option is to help them to find their own individual routine, perhaps.

J_D
-14th June 2005, 15:53
I'm obviously not "in the main"

John Rohde
-15th June 2005, 13:20
Originally posted by J_D
I'm obviously not "in the main"

When have you ever tried to be? I was trying to make our club sound young and trendy - I should have just said that you are one of our leading lights.
Of course, all generalisation distorts.

Russell1985
-22nd June 2005, 17:01
One we use in MA's translates quite well into fencing.

Stand opposite your opponent just within arms reach. Both of you On Guard with your right foot forward.

Easy
Without moving your feet you have to try and tap your opponent on either shoulder (using either hand) and vis versa. You can move your shoulders to evade but not block with your hands.

Hard
Same as easy, but you can tap their front as well (have this counting as 3 points or sumthin if you want to make it competitive). You can also move the front foot to avoid the tap.

This one is good to get beginners thinking about things like second intention and feints etc without them suffering the red mist holding a sword sometimes induces.

Obviously get ppl of equal ages/builds together and emphasise that the tap is GENTLE :tongue:

Aoife
-1st July 2005, 14:32
Unfortunately, 'gentle' doesn't mean much to some people!