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Aoife
-18th June 2003, 21:25
Does anybody know where I might be able to get my hands on a dummy to use in fencing? As a target of some sort.


Thanks.

Mantis
-18th June 2003, 22:36
Well, if you are ever in Manchester I will let you know where and when I train.

Oh, I see. You mean an inanimate dummy.

clockity
-18th June 2003, 23:01
No idea.

How about a second hand art mannequin, shop mannequin or sparing dummy (maybe eBay)?

Alternativly, place a cushion at the same height as an opponent's chest (top of a sofa) and try hitting the same point on it from different distances like the en garde position and where you have to lunge. You probably would want a cushion with a sturdy covering so it doesn't get pierced. One with a pattern could present you with targets. This could be expanded to covering a block of wood with foam or rubber with drawn on targets (to save cushion wear and tear).

Or maybe Mantis...

Does this help, or am I rambling?

Gav
-19th June 2003, 05:52
If you can get a hold of a copy, then Rudy Volkman's book - Magnum Libre Escrime - contains detailed instructions on how to make one. The tricky part is the hand-spring assembly.

Muso440
-19th June 2003, 08:11
Originally posted by Gav
If you can get a hold of a copy, then Rudy Volkman's book - Magnum Libre Escrime

'IF' being the operative word here! I saw that mentioned on a website and thought I'd quite like a copy - however it's out of print and I can't find it on any 2nd hand web sites. Anyone got any ideas? :confused:

Gav
-19th June 2003, 08:24
Erm... I have a copy.

You can get hold of one directly from Rudy if you contact him or send Craig the webmaster for fencing.net site an email and he can help you out.

Rudy produces it by hand, he really needs to find a publisher for it and get it professionally produced, that's why you are finding it difficult to get hold of. Considering how popular it is amongst the beginners in the US I would be surprised if he did have problems getting it published.

I've lost the email address for Rudy but if you go to www.fencing101.com/vb and do a search for 'fencing dummy' you'll find plenty about how to get the book and advice about how to put a dummy together.

Muso440
-19th June 2003, 08:26
Cool. Can you PM me an email addresses for either of those, perchance? (Or I'll track down Craig via fencing.net)

Sasori
-19th June 2003, 09:41
Yeah, I got a copy of that book too, made the dummy, but before I can use it I need to get a spring strong enough to work the hand! Been sitting at that stage for the past year or two...

Back to Aoife's question, you can also get target pads for hitting. We have a few at our club, but I have absolutely no idea where they originally came from or who made them! Anyone?

rory
-19th June 2003, 09:57
Leon Paul Lunging Pad (http://www.leonpaul.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Salle_Equipement_54.html)


Other people make them too methinks. Dunno who though. :)

HSD
-19th June 2003, 11:19
Originally posted by Aoife
Does anybody know where I might be able to get my hands on a dummy to use in fencing? As a target of some sort.


Thanks.

If you fence in the school gym (well, you might!!) there will be ropes hung from the ceiling (maybe). Take two adjacent ropes, tie them together, with the knot slightly beneath your head height, and hang a mask off it (the knot, I mean). It's no good if your target needs a sword, but is excellent for practicing cuts in sabre.

Also, for pint control in all three weapons, use a single gym rope as a target. When you get a good hit in the centre of teh rope, you'll know it, and feel immense satisfaction. If you have brick walls, use the mortar "T" where three bricks meet as your point of aim. If you have slats, use the groove between them as your target.

These are all great for practising blade / pojn t control, but no substitute for a real human being. When I grew up we didn't have fencing dummies, so we made do *mumble* *grumble*.

Rdb811
-19th June 2003, 12:53
Old cricket ball, 'eye' ring amd sring - not quite got round to it yt.

clockity
-19th June 2003, 14:30
Originally posted by HSD
If you fence in the school gym (well, you might!!) there will be ropes hung from the ceiling (maybe). Take two adjacent ropes, tie them together, with the knot slightly beneath your head height, and hang a mask off it (the knot, I mean). It's no good if your target needs a sword, but is excellent for practicing cuts in sabre.

Also, for pint control in all three weapons, use a single gym rope as a target. When you get a good hit in the centre of teh rope, you'll know it, and feel immense satisfaction. If you have brick walls, use the mortar "T" where three bricks meet as your point of aim. If you have slats, use the groove between them as your target.

These are all great for practising blade / pojn t control, but no substitute for a real human being. When I grew up we didn't have fencing dummies, so we made do *mumble* *grumble*.

We never had dummies either HSD... But we never needed to practice pint control!


Originally posted by rory
Leon Paul Lunging Pad (http://www.leonpaul.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Salle_Equipement_54.html)


Other people make them too methinks. Dunno who though. :)

Those are the pad things I was thinking of. A target with a bit of give in it, so you don't damage the point of your sword.

HSD
-19th June 2003, 14:52
Originally posted by clockity
We never had dummies either HSD... But we never needed to practice pint control!


Yeah, thanks for that. I meant bladder control ;-)

oiuyt
-19th June 2003, 16:45
Another easy target for point control can be made with a golf ball, an eyehook, and some fishing line. Screw the eyehook into the golf ball (tip: start the hole with a nail first, the eyehook will screw in much more easily), use the fishing line to tie the ball hanging down off of something so that it's at wrist level.

Practice with the ball both still and moving.

This can also be used to work on disengages.

-B :)

Jenrick
-20th June 2003, 23:16
Try the american PBT web site. some great tools for lunge practice etc. delivery to uk seems cheap enough.
Failing that go to a charity shop and buy a tailor 's dummy, pad it with a pillow and use it for practice.

Aoife
-21st June 2003, 17:32
Thanks everyone. I'll look into shop mannequins and tailor's dummies, because we need something that we can stand in the playground (where we've been moved to during the exam period), and in the main school Hall (where we've been moved to everything Thursday by dance classes- makes no sense, I know, that we with the swords have to move :) )

On normal Mondays we're in the gym, so I'll look into the ropes (but getting them out from the wall always seemed to be tantamount to brain surgery to me in the lower years).

We've been playing the glove game every now and then when the classes are small. I'm somewhat hopeless at it- 0/10- whoops :(

We mostly need the dummies to practise fleching at. (me standing with a cup on my shoulder wasn't adequet at all--- mostly because when I laughed, as I invariably did, it fell off :) )

Rdb811
-22nd June 2003, 20:04
There's a golve excerise where one fencer holds out glove at arm's length and drops it when the other claps his hand - the clapper then has to catch (rather similar to the gun and monkey experiment) - good way of practising fleches.

Jenrick
-22nd June 2003, 21:27
Try fencing while sitting in chairs. Distance set is blade to elbow of longest reach. Should vastly improve point control with practice.

Rdb811
-22nd June 2003, 22:28
I've posted this before, but chair fencing is a good excerise.

ceprab
-23rd June 2003, 09:11
Tennis ball on a string, hung off a door (or tree or whatever) so that it is at bout chest height. Hang a small weight off the ball via another string.
Gives a nice cheap target that moves a bit to make things interesting.
Gym ropes do the same thing with less effort.

Sabre: Sit a mask on top of a badminton post.

Bladework: I have no idea. The first post suggesting you hit a living dummy seems best to me.