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doobarz
-22nd June 2003, 21:02
Have just had a complete nightmare in the C du N poules, though fenced well in the DE (not quite well enough) and the team event.

Why do I have so much inconsistancy? I don't conciously do anything differently before I fence well/ badly.

Any ideas?

Hudson
-22nd June 2003, 21:07
have the same problem myself and a few other people i know do too.

we seem to think it just has something to do phycologicly (not splet right i know) all to do with your mental prep before you fight, by the time you get to the DE your more focused and everything comes together alot smoother than in the pools.

Rdb811
-22nd June 2003, 22:26
I find it takes me a while to get going as well (except for the comps when I start off well and fall apart after the first fight).

ceprab
-23rd June 2003, 13:06
Not being warmed up properly? Not just physically, but having had a few fights to get into the groove.

I have the opposite problem - good in poule, but go to pieces in a DE from tensing up. I know what I do, but can't stop getting nervous I guess. Just need to keep entering stuff until I get used to it. (am improving).

Being able to fight in the DE's sonds better to me.:)

Rdb811
-23rd June 2003, 22:18
quite possibly, although usually I do warm up reasonably well - I suspect it's because I don't usually get to 'warp spedd' during the week.

3 Card Trick
-24th June 2003, 09:58
I have the opposite problem - good in poule, but go to pieces in a DE from tensing up. I know what I do, but can't stop getting nervous I guess. Just need to keep entering stuff until I get used to it. (am improving).

Try thinking of only the hit you are fencing and not that there are 15 hits to be scored.

aao
-24th June 2003, 13:37
It really is just mental, I always found that I used to do better in the poules when I was a worse fencer as I would know that I had to concentrate totally in order to win the fights, as a result I would often win the poule or only drop a fight. When you get to be a better fencer and start expecting results you tend to take your eye off the ball a bit in the poules and drop some silly fights, however because they are at domestic events you're not too bothered as you can always make it up in the DE.

The problem with this attitude is that at foreigns the standard is much higher and if you're not fully focused you won't just lose the odd silly fight you'll be lucky to win any at all! By the time you reach the DE (if you do ) you will be more focused on the job at hand as you know if you lose you're out.

The trick to it all is really to have faith in yourself , nerves etc only come about because you tend to no be fully confident in your own ability when going into a fight, at the end of the day you can only do your best if you lose to a better fencer then so be it.

DonnCarnage
-28th June 2003, 19:10
Treat every oppenent in all your fights with high respect.

Also, focus on winning every fight one at a time, and dont get distracted by other people.

Flash's got it right when he kept on saying FOCUS!!!

DC:pirate:

tigger
-9th July 2003, 10:00
Doobarz - C du N in Newcastle had a bunch of weird results tho! Having seen u fence a few times (and fenced u a few myself), I think a couple of things:

1 You don't have enough commitment in your attacks - your pace doesn't change - ie no acceleration after you've prepared. I think you prefer to parry cos your scared of being hit on preparation. Do your small, slowish preparations out of distance but then put in a burst of speed to finish off the hit

2 I disagree with DonnCarnage, i think you give your opponents TOO MUCH respect!

3 I could be wrong here, but you seem to premeditate your attacks a lot, and stick with them even if the conditions change. Premeditation is fine, as long as you keep your eyes open and are ready to adapt

However, your basic technique is very tidy (a lot better than mine), and everythings pretty much in the right place. Just keep plugging away, claw your way up the rankings and the pools will get easier!

fencingmaster
-27th July 2003, 13:45
For really excellent understanding of preparation for competition refer to 'Sporting Body Sporting Mind' by Syer & Connolly, also 'Think to Win' same authors ISBN 0-671-69717-x
Good Luck

whizzkid1982
-28th July 2003, 10:23
1 You don't have enough commitment in your attacks - your pace doesn't change - ie no acceleration after you've prepared. I think you prefer to parry cos your scared of being hit on preparation. Do your small, slowish preparations out of distance but then put in a burst of speed to finish off the hit

2 I disagree with DonnCarnage, i think you give your opponents TOO MUCH respect!

3 I could be wrong here, but you seem to premeditate your attacks a lot, and stick with them even if the conditions change. Premeditation is fine, as long as you keep your eyes open and are ready to adapt




i would agree with this, doobarz. however i do not think it is all your fault!! since going to north east have become much more scared of prepartion attacks as well cos it gets done on me so much!! the trick is to keep practising going forward in training. make a concious effort to train in a style that is different to how you normally fence. this gets you confident with it and then you start to use it when you fence in competitions as well.

Chris Morgan
-31st July 2003, 19:45
I find that i lose my first two fights against weaker opponents then do really well against the stronger opponants. By the time i get to the DE i have got past that dreeriness you get at the start of the competition, especially if you have travelled far. I think its all down to mental and physical preperation.

randomsabreur
-2nd August 2003, 15:38
An alternative explanation for chris would be that weaker fencers are often more difficult to fence properly than the stronger fencers. The more experienced fencers will react is a semi rational fashion and their blade will move predictably. against an inexperienced, you might get tangled up in a mess of blade that neither you nor your opponent has any idea where it is. My suggestion would to work on preparing at a comfortable distance, out of the way of unexpected hits and try to hit under the mess.

Chris Morgan
-6th August 2003, 09:29
Thats very true when distance is applied for the weaker fencers you can work out their style (if they have one!) theres one guy at my club a foilist who fences me at epee whos completely unpredictable, i often find myself two or three points down to him because of that!

pTeppic
-24th August 2003, 16:24
Originally posted by doobarz
Why do I have so much inconsistancy? I don't conciously do anything differently before I fence well/ badly.

Any ideas?

doobarz, you need to channel your Chi and learn to trully kick ass.

Oh, and be properly psyched.

Regards,

Kian :-P