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CKRedd
-29th July 2003, 21:24
Okay, when buying weapons, or anything else I suppose, do you think it is more advisable (preferable) to buy very good (albeit more expensive) and have it last longer, or to buy cheaper?

What about the LP light-weight stuff?

CK.

PS - Do LP only sell the one type of pistol grip?

Rdb811
-29th July 2003, 21:37
Depends - for epee and foil blades it's worth getting maraging

CKRedd
-29th July 2003, 21:39
Electric, Dry, or one of both?

CK.

Gav
-30th July 2003, 05:43
The simple answer is ... it depends.

Are you competing? If you are get the best kit you can afford but make sure you make at the very least the minimum clothing requirement.

If you are not competing internationally then buying Maraging may be too expensive. I've found the LP regular blades to be quite reliable although now that I compete more heavily they don't last as long. If you are competing internationaally then I guess you wouldn't be asking this question! :grin:

If you are not competing then go for the minimum club requirement. No need to bother with Maraging. Get electric weapons if your club has electric boxes [most do].

Make sure you get [in no particular order]:


Mask - consider getting a good one.
glove
weapon
jacket
breeches- I know some people don't bother - but really I don't like fencing without breeches all that much.
bag
socks
decent trainers - squash shoes are alright, go for fencing trainers if you want.
If you are competing [even if you don't] consider getting the minimum toolkit: allen key, super glue, precision screwdriver, needle nose pliers, monkey wrench and of course som gaffer tape.


If you want more specific advice then we would need to know more about your fencing habits.

CKRedd
-30th July 2003, 22:41
Thank you sir, much appreciated!

And for sabre?


By the way, how is Scotland these days? I was in Glasgow for Christmas a couple of years ago (before I made my way over the Atlantic), and the surrounding areas were quite stunning.

CK.

Rdb811
-30th July 2003, 23:01
Originally posted by Gav

Make sure you get [in no particular order]:


Mask - consider getting a good one.
glove
weapon
jacket
breeches- I know some people don't bother - but really I don't like fencing without breeches all that much.
bag
socks
decent trainers - squash shoes are alright, go for fencing trainers if you want.
If you are competing [even if you don't] consider getting the minimum toolkit: allen key, super glue, precision screwdriver, needle nose pliers, monkey wrench and of course som gaffer tape.


If you want more specific advice then we would need to know more about your fencing habits.

I'd empathise squash shoes and not trainers - I've seen too many raw beginners suffering with their footwork through wearing built up trainers.

Breeches for epee, definatley

Jenrick
-1st August 2003, 09:39
We'd a girl turned to the club to fence. She was wearing the bulky type trainers. As she went for a lunge her foot slipped caught on the large sole and she ended up damaging her ankle pretty bad.
So if going to get shoes at least wear squash type ones but not fashion statement ones
:fencingsm

:swordpen:

Marcos
-1st August 2003, 09:53
Originally posted by CKRedd
I was in Glasgow for Christmas a couple of years ago (before I made my way over the Atlantic), and the surrounding areas were quite stunning.

CK.

are you saying that Glasgow itself isn't stunning?

actually, saw Glasgow in a travel show recently and the shopping district is looking really smart.

To get back on topic, in my last 2 sabre comps I have slipped badly hurting my right ankle and knee when changing direction.
In both cases there was dirt on the ground, but does anyone have any advice? are there fencing shoes that support the ankle?

At the moment use squash shoes (readily available and cheap!)
:smallviol

clockity
-1st August 2003, 10:24
Originally posted by Marcos
To get back on topic, in my last 2 sabre comps I have slipped badly hurting my right ankle and knee when changing direction.
In both cases there was dirt on the ground, but does anyone have any advice? are there fencing shoes that support the ankle?

At the moment use squash shoes (readily available and cheap!)
:smallviol

I too have had ankle injuries in the past from fencing in squash shoes. My ankles are fairly weak, what with five-a-side football and other indoor sports that I did in my youth. They can be twisted fairly easily, so I bought the Adidas Hi Top boots, that support my ankles very well.

There are a few fencing boots that support the ankle. They usually have two plastic struts (that can be taken out of the boot) that go down the sides of the boot. Adidas and Viktoria both make boots. Adidas have their new "Equipment" range avaliable in "Hi" (boots) versions, as well as their older "Hi Top" boots. Viktoria do boots too. They're usually avaliable from most of the fencing vendors in the UK.

Picture links fo the boots are below:
Adidas Hi Tops (http://www.thefencingpost.com/Pictures/Shoes/CS04a.JPG)
Adidas Equipment Hi Tops (http://www.thefencingpost.com/Pictures/Shoes/CS00.JPG)
Viktoria Pro Hi (http://www.viktoria.co.uk/images/boot_details.jpg)

My Adidas Hi Tops will probably need replacing soon, so I'll probably try and get hold of the Equipment Hi Tops or the Viktorias soon. I think it may take a bit of calling around to get hold of a pair though, as not all of the fencing suppliers list them, but I would think they could order them.

Any comments on being able to order items for clients from Adidas King Kenny?:natter:

Gav
-1st August 2003, 10:35
You can get the Viktoria pro-high's from http://www.viktoria.co.uk/.

I don't think that LP stock them.

clockity
-1st August 2003, 12:09
Originally posted by Gav
You can get the Viktoria pro-high's from http://www.viktoria.co.uk/.

I don't think that LP stock them.

Thanks Gav, I think the Viktoria's are listed on LP's website (plus the 12.5% discount next week ;)). I was more interested in being bale to get hold of the Adidas Equipment Hi Tops, as I like my old Adidas Hi Tops so much. The Asymmetrics would be nice, but they don't seem to offer extra ankle support. I was wondering if LP could get hold of them (from Adidas) for me.

Gav
-1st August 2003, 12:15
No worries!

Had a 'D'oh' moment when I realised thay you had taken your pics from the Viktoria site. I just left the link in case anyone was intrested.

doobarz
-1st August 2003, 12:19
Allstar UK stock the Equipment Hi's - www.allstar-fencing.co.uk

clockity
-1st August 2003, 13:17
Originally posted by doobarz
Allstar UK stock the Equipment Hi's - www.allstar-fencing.co.uk

doobarz I think I'll give them a call. The picture that they link to shows the old Adidas Hi's though. I'm sure it's just an error on teh site. But seeing as you need to call :natter: (or mail) them to make payment on an order, I'll give them a call when my lovely boots give up the ghost.:(

I think I'll be ordering a bit of kit soon with the LP sale this coming week. Last year I got loads of stuff that needed replacing, this year I think it won't quite be so much.

Marcos
-1st August 2003, 13:23
cheers guys - really useful
:thumbs_up

Rdb811
-1st August 2003, 22:51
I use the Hi-top boots - really really good - with the struts in on the leading foot and out on the back foot with sorbothane shock absorber inserts. to help the fit - well worth the money.

haggis
-2nd August 2003, 01:59
Wearing the high top boots will weaken your ankles because the muscles that support the ankle are not required to do as much work. If you do subsequently injure your ankle, your recovery will be much slower because the muscles are underdeveloped. If your ankles have already been trashed by previous injuries (like Clockity) then fair enough. If your ankles are generally fine, buy some shoes and spend the difference on a wobble-board to keep the ankles strong.

clockity
-2nd August 2003, 10:37
Originally posted by haggis
Wearing the high top boots will weaken your ankles because the muscles that support the ankle are not required to do as much work. If you do subsequently injure your ankle, your recovery will be much slower because the muscles are underdeveloped. If your ankles have already been trashed by previous injuries (like Clockity) then fair enough. If your ankles are generally fine, buy some shoes and spend the difference on a wobble-board to keep the ankles strong.

I guess having none trashed ankles in the first place would help... Is this "wobble board" similar to the thing that the Chinese State Circus acrobats use to balance themselves on (a short plank balanced on a big tube)? Or is it the thing Rolf Harris uses? :tongue:

Barry Paul
-2nd August 2003, 10:56
hi, Leon Paul do stock all Addidas range including Hi (But last delivery from them was missing a few of the Hi boot sizes). We also stock Victoria Hi and Low. Buy now in the sale and save some money.

I agree with Haggis don't start to wear hi boots unless you have to. To avoid the flick hits footwork has become even more important and fencing requires great ability to change direction quickly. This puts a great deal of stress on the ankles. Top fencers should include in their training specific excercises for the ankle and lower leg muscels.

Barry Paul M.D. Leon Paul

Rdb811
-2nd August 2003, 18:59
Originally posted by clockity
Is this "wobble board" similar to the thing that the Chinese State Circus acrobats use to balance themselves on (a short plank balanced on a big tube)? Or is it the thing Rolf Harris uses? :tongue:

It may be called a Freman board it's a disc on top of a half ball.

Rdb811
-2nd August 2003, 19:03
Originally posted by haggis
Wearing the high top boots will weaken your ankles because the muscles that support the ankle are not required to do as much work. If you do subsequently injure your ankle, your recovery will be much slower because the muscles are underdeveloped. If your ankles have already been trashed by previous injuries (like Clockity) then fair enough. If your ankles are generally fine, buy some shoes and spend the difference on a wobble-board to keep the ankles strong.

:eekk2: Does it make that much differnce - Iwear boots all the time non-fencing) ?

clockity
-2nd August 2003, 23:34
Originally posted by Rdb811
:eekk2: Does it make that much differnce - Iwear boots all the time non-fencing) ?
Maybe I should try the wobble board (to stregthen the ankles) and get some non-boot fencing shoes then... :confused:

Does it look like this?
http://www.fitter1.com/media/wb_side_to_side.gif

Rdb811
-3rd August 2003, 00:11
That's the baby - my physio had me using one when i had ny knee problem - I've one at home (but haven't got round to using it) = it's for balance, not really for the ankles. (I think).

I don't hav problem ankels (touch wood) - I thought as a result of wearing the boots - i did spain one a few years ago and know it's 'looser' than the other but iat the momnet there the on bit of the body that dosen't twinge so I'll stick with them -[ unless sombody says the boots are an accident waiting to happen.

frazzled
-3rd August 2003, 15:45
Hi

My son tore three of the four ligaments (nearly severing one) in his ankle while in Hungary fencing. He fell down the stairs!!!!!

The hospital in Hungary put him in plaster in which he was flown back on a stretcher using 6 seats of a British Airways jet to UK (thank God for insurance!). After several appointments with an Orthopaedic surgeon and MRI's (thank God for insurance again) tha plaster was cut off to allow physio and he had to use an "air cast" plaster as per David Beckham.

Under the sports physio's guidance, my son was back running on a treadmill after two weeks and fencing gently at three weeks. (He continued to have lessons and even fought some sitting down even when on crutches - MAD!)

The sports physio indicated that he did so much damage to his ankle as his ankles were inflexible. She advised the use of a wobble board to train the ankle to realise when it was going over too far and to therefore engage the muscles of the leg to straighten the ankle. She also encouraged stretching exercises so that should he go over again (inevitably), he wouldn't do much damage, and also suggested placing a small ball on the balls of the feet and rocking it around in ever decreasing circles when watching telly. Also, walking/running on uneven ground is good. She did not advise the use of strapping after the initial injury had healed, as she indicated that the only way to deal with weak ankles is to strengthem the muscles supporting the ankle and by making the ligaments more elastic.

One year later he still continues with the exercises and has gone over on the same ankle several times now, but never with the severity of before.

Rdb811
-3rd August 2003, 17:41
Originally posted by frazzled
(He continued to have lessons and even fought some sitting down even when on crutches - MAD!)



Actually it' a good exercise - w've had a couple do it while recoevring from injury - and a good way of teaching point control.

frazzled
-4th August 2003, 10:28
Yes, it does teach good point control. Also, he said that as he could not "run away" from his attacker, it ensured that his defence (parry??) was better.

It certainly knackered his arm much more than "normal" fencing and did look so funny!!

Rdb811
-4th August 2003, 23:51
Steam sabre is pretty cool - you actually have to rely on technique rather than speed.

doobarz
-5th August 2003, 09:20
Originally posted by Rdb811
Steam sabre is pretty cool - you actually have to rely on technique rather than speed.

Shouldn't be a problem with electric sabre, as long as the referee is good.

Rdb811
-5th August 2003, 12:44
Originally posted by Rdb811
Steam sabre is pretty cool - you actually have to rely on technique rather than speed.

I meant to say "Seated electric sabre" - not steam sabre. :oops