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Thread: Arm problems

  1. #1

    Default Arm problems

    Hi everyone,

    I'll try to keep it short but I've started fencing again after 7months off due a bowel removal and reversal ops, I fenced ok really, apart from the gained weight the only problem I have really is that I'm losing strength in my fencing hand half way through a match, from forearm to hand it goes dead and I can hardly grip my foil, at the moment I can't do weights due to still recovering, does anyone have any suggestions to either strengthen arm or reduce the loss in feeling? I dont grip too hard either.

    Cheers
    Valentino rossi - leading the way since 1996

  2. #2
    Member LordAdmiralFlungeVIIIEsq.'s Avatar
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    Default

    Check out www.nsdball.com.
    Its a handheld gyroscope thats great for building strength in your Hands, Wrists and Arms.
    Its not very intensive (unless you want to go nuts with it) but gives good gradual results.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk 2
    I do love the internet :3

  3. #3

    Default

    I think there is some internal swelling somewhere near to your shoulder that causes problem or pain in arms.I think you should consult with an orthopedic surgeon.

  4. #4
    Initiate
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    Default

    I am just recovering from an extenisve arm problem. Temporarily lost the use of two fingers on sword arm during de. Had to withdraw Anyway neck was the issue and I would advocate going to a good sports physio first rather than a surgeon. You could visit your GP and get a scan first if you prefer.
    Have to say the physio was perhaps one of the most painful experiences I have had but goodness me has it made a difference
    Hoping it is a simple and easily fixed problem for you

  5. #5
    Forum Rabbit
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    I am just recovering from an extenisve arm problem. I think you should consult with an orthopedic surgeon.
    cch giảm cn hiệu quả nhất gia tăng thnh phần serotonin trong no, gip bạn t cảm thấy đi cch giảm cn gip cơ thể tiu thụ đường dễ dng hơn giảm cn nhanh hoạt động ngăn chặn sự pht triển tế bo mỡ thuốc giảm cn hoạt đồng ny cắt giảm thm ăn v ngăn chặn qu trnh tạo mở cch giảm cn nhanh hoạt động đốt chy mở kp

  6. #6
    Forum Rabbit
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    Smile Try alkalizing your diet

    Although this might not seem like the thing to do but try adding something called a 'super greens powder' to your diet. You can find them online and in your local health / organic store. Basically, it's like drinking a 6-8 servings of vegetables a day. I can swear by it. It has given me way more energy, my workouts last longer and I feel better overall. Try it out, I think it will definitely help you especially with 'recovery'.

  7. #7
    Forum Rabbit
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    Default

    I had joined the jim for bodybuilder then after some time there is so many pain in my arms and I dont know whats problem .

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yahir View Post
    I had joined the jim for bodybuilder then after some time there is so many pain in my arms and I dont know whats problem .
    Jim is a really nice guy usually, I have no idea why he would hurt your arms.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Nick's Avatar
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    Suggestion number 1: Be patient. Think back to when you started fencing, your hands and legs would get tired and ache and at times even hurt. It takes time to get it all back.
    Suggestion number 2: Get hold of a lacrosse ball or accuball or similar and use it to work on the muscles and tendons that run up your forearm. It's possible that when you stopped fencing scar tissue formed and wasn't getting broken down by you fencing repeatedly. Relatedly it's possible that the amount of lactic acid building up as you train is having a negative impact and you may simply not be maintaining a high enough level of hydration to allow your body to flush out the rubbish.
    so Suggestion 3: Drink more water than you think you need to during and after training.

    Suggestion 4: finger gymnastics to get everything mobile again.

    I second the suggestion of using a gyroball. Once you have the technique down it's a very effective way to strengthen your hand and forearm.
    I would also second the suggestion of seeing a sports therapist or physio. Ideally one that is qualified to do hands on remedial work (not all physios can) and ideally one that can use ultrasound.
    Finally back to my first point BE PATIENT. It will take time.
    Jason Nesmith : You WILL go out there.
    Alexander Dane : I won't and nothing you say will make me.
    Jason Nesmith : The show must go on.
    Alexander Dane : ...Damn you.

    Next Competition:t.b.d.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick View Post
    Suggestion number 1: Be patient. Think back to when you started fencing, your hands and legs would get tired and ache and at times even hurt. It takes time to get it all back.
    Suggestion number 2: Get hold of a lacrosse ball or accuball or similar and use it to work on the muscles and tendons that run up your forearm. It's possible that when you stopped fencing scar tissue formed and wasn't getting broken down by you fencing repeatedly. Relatedly it's possible that the amount of lactic acid building up as you train is having a negative impact and you may simply not be maintaining a high enough level of hydration to allow your body to flush out the rubbish.
    so Suggestion 3: Drink more water than you think you need to during and after training.

    Suggestion 4: finger gymnastics to get everything mobile again.

    I second the suggestion of using a gyroball. Once you have the technique down it's a very effective way to strengthen your hand and forearm.
    I would also second the suggestion of seeing a sports therapist or physio. Ideally one that is qualified to do hands on remedial work (not all physios can) and ideally one that can use ultrasound.
    Finally back to my first point BE PATIENT. It will take time.
    Who are you replying to?

  11. #11
    Senior Member Nick's Avatar
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    Exeter Devon, Chelmsford Essex
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FencingMove View Post
    Who are you replying to?
    The OP given the thread is about arm discomfort. Although I agree Jim is a lovely guy but have ended up with sore arms after fencing epee with him
    Jason Nesmith : You WILL go out there.
    Alexander Dane : I won't and nothing you say will make me.
    Jason Nesmith : The show must go on.
    Alexander Dane : ...Damn you.

    Next Competition:t.b.d.

  12. #12

    Default Good Keep work hard for your fitness,

    Quote Originally Posted by valentino46 View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I'll try to keep it short but I've started fencing again after 7months off due a bowel removal and reversal ops, I fenced ok really, apart from the gained weight the only problem I have really is that I'm losing strength in my fencing hand half way through a match, from forearm to hand it goes dead and I can hardly grip my foil, at the moment I can't do weights due to still recovering, does anyone have any suggestions to either strengthen arm or reduce the loss in feeling? I dont grip too hard either.

    Cheers
    regularly do exercise for mazimize your efficiency,
    I'm event blogger at Happy Veterans Day 2018

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